2010-2025 Strategic Business Goals

A 2010–2025 STRATEGIC BUSINESS GOALS OCTOBER 12, 2021 STRIVING FOR PREEMINENCE

B George L. Hanbury II, Ph.D., NSU president and CEO, meets with students at the Don Taft University Center, which features a shark mural by marine artist, scientist, and ecologist Guy Harvey, Ph.D. All photos were taken prior to February 2020.

1 Contents Page A Message from President George L. Hanbury ll, Ph.D.................................................................. 3 Executive Summary................................................................................................................................... 4 2010–2020 STRATEGIC PRIORITIES RECAP Enhance Student Performance/Engagement/Retention........................................................... 7 Enhance Faculty Quality....................................................................................................................... 9 Enhance Academic Program Quality................................................................................................11 Increase Nontuition Funding. ............................................................................................................ 12 Improve Incoming Undergraduate Student Quality.................................................................... 13 Enhance Targeted Recruitment......................................................................................................... 14 Original and Enhanced Statements..................................................................................................... 17 NSU Core Value Descriptions................................................................................................................. 18 VISION 2025 STRATEGIC BUSINESS GOALS Students....................................................................................................................................................20 Philanthropic Resources......................................................................................................................22 Scholarship and Research...................................................................................................................23 Community Service...............................................................................................................................24 Belonging, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion....................................................................................26 ASPIRATIONAL PREEMINENT PROGRAM GOALS FOR DEANS AND COLLEGES NSU Program Preeminence Statement for Strategic Business Goals 2025.........................28 Aspirational Preeminent Program Goals........................................................................................30 Appendix. .....................................................................................................................................................34

2

3 A Message from President George L. Hanbury ll, Ph.D. Nova Southeastern University’s (NSU’s) Vision 2020—Strategic Business Plan was created in 2010. It has served as the guiding document for all our successes. We have made significant strides and met nearly all our goals, including raising more than $550 million for philanthropy and research and exceeding undergraduate recruitment goals. Implementing the provisions of this plan provided the framework for NSU to be stronger for our students, faculty and staff members, and the community we serve. We have reached success by progressing toward each milestone month by month and year by year, while building our reputation and areas of excellence, and finally being ranked in the top 200+ colleges and universities in the nation. I present to you the phenomenal accomplishments of what many called “audacious” matrices of Vision 2020, and the new strategic business goals for an “enhanced” Vision 2020—NSU’s Vision 2025. Our Vision 2025 allows us to refocus our strategic priorities and set new targets to guide us forward through continual improvement on a path toward preeminence. This plan was created by NSU’s senior leadership and Board of Trustees with input from faculty and staff members and students across the university. It is a guiding document for the entire NSU community, and I want to thank all of those who put in endless hours of committed work to evaluate the current university landscape, interview key stakeholders, and make data-based decisions on how and where to invest the university’s precious resources in a fiscally responsible manner to drive success and be recognized by our peers as a preeminent university. This plan lays out that framework, and I have tasked each dean and vice president to be accountable for how they will help achieve the greater vision through measurable outcomes. NSU has long been recognized for its innovation. Now is the time for us to be even more inventive in course delivery and academic quality, philanthropy and research, and serving the NSU and broader communities in which we reside. This is not my plan, or the deans’ and vice presidents’ plan, nor is it the NSU Board of Trustees’ plan. It’s NSU’s Enhanced Vision 2020 plan—Vision 2025. Together, we will recognize preeminence. While the content of this document will guide and focus our efforts, it is all of the people associated with NSU who will execute the plan and bring it to fruition. As always, keep your aim beyond your reach. FINS UP! George L. Hanbury II, Ph.D. President and Chief Executive Officer

4 In 2010, NSU set forth an ambitious agenda to improve in 36 measurable outcomes to demonstrate the achievement of Vision 2020. These goals guided the day-to-day work of NSU’s faculty and staff members throughout the 10 years. Ultimately, NSU achieved or exceeded targets, or made significant progress, on 86 percent of the measures. Had there been no changes in U.S. policy toward international students and in the policies of foreign countries to support their students to come to the U.S., the university would have exceeded or made significant progress on 94 percent of the measurable outcomes. The measures were organized within six strategic priorities: Enhance Student Performance/Engagement/Retention, Enhance Faculty Quality, Enhance Academic Program Quality, Increase Nontuition Funding, Improve Incoming Undergraduate Student Quality, and Enhance Targeted Recruitment. Targets were met or exceeded within each priority. Highlights Include • increasing undergraduate, first-time- in-college retention rates by more than 10 percentage points • increasing undergraduate, first-time- in-college graduation rates by more than 25 percentage points • raising more than $300 million in cumulative gift commitments • growing external funding with cumulative contracts/grants awarded exceeding $300 million • increasing the endowment market value from $46 million to $132 million • increasing the number of accrediting bodies that recognize a degree program—or programs— from 18 to 26 and the number of accredited degree programs from 21 to 40 • raising the student housing occupancy from 81 percent to maximum capacity in 2019 Enhancing targeted recruitment is the priority where five targets were not achieved. And, as stated earlier, it is important to note that three of those targets were about increasing international student enrollment at all three degree levels— undergraduate, graduate, and professional. At the time when the targets were set, international student enrollment was on the rise nationally. NSU’s international enrollment did increase at the graduate and professional level for several years before changes in U.S. policy toward international students and in the policies of several foreign countries about supporting their students studying in the United States resulted in extraordinary and unpredicted declines in international student enrollment across the nation. If those three measures were excluded, NSU met or exceeded 55 percent of our targets, and made progress on 39 percent, for a total of 94 percent of targets met, exceeded, or had progress demonstrated on. Detailed results for each measure are provided in the following tables. “...a premier, private, not-for-profit university Executive Summary Vision 2020 Targets Achieved and Progress Made By 2020, through excellence and innovations in teaching, research, service, and learning, Nova Southeastern University will be recognized by accrediting agencies, the academic community, and the general public as a premier, private, not-for-profit university of quality and distinction that engages all students and produces alumni who serve with integrity in their lives, fields of study, and resulting careers. VISION 2020

5 of quality and distinction...” Both NSU’s Board of Trustees and President’s Council retreats of 2019 and 2020 were primarily devoted to reviewing progress toward Vision 2020 and looking ahead to an Enhanced Vision 2020. It was determined that overall, NSU is on the right path, and its vision and mission only needed to be enhanced with a few minor changes. The Vision 2025 statement raises NSU’s goals for recognition from premier to preeminent and recognizes our distinction as a professional-dominant, doctoralresearch university. The mission statement was also enhanced to recognize NSU’s selective admissions policies. The core values remain unchanged. With enhanced vision and mission statements in place for 2025, NSU leadership worked throughout 2019 and 2020 to review the strategic business goal metrics, ensuring that the correct measures were in place, and bold—yet realistic. Targets were set to demonstrate the achievement of Vision 2025. Of the original 36 measures from Vision 2020, 14 have been retained and new targets set. An additional 12 measures have been added to fully reflect the breadth and depth of the vision. Measures and targets were selected with an eye toward the use of publicly available data whenever possible to be able to demonstrate preeminence amongst peer institutions. The full set of 26 strategic business goals are organized into 5 focus areas: Students (subdivided by entering-student quality, student experience, and student outcomes), philanthropic resources, scholarship and research, community service, and belonging, equity, diversity, and inclusion. The specific measures, baseline data, and targets are provided in the following tables. In addition to the 26 strategic business goals, the president also challenged each college to identify at least one program to improve and enhance to demonstrate preeminence among their peers. The President’s Council accepted the challenge and has developed a set of measurement principles for identifying programmatic preeminence. Further details on the assessment of preeminence follow the strategic business goals. Vision 2025 Statement By 2025, NSU will be recognized as a preeminent, professional-dominant, doctoral-research university that provides competitive career advantages to its students and produces alumni who serve and lead with integrity. Mission Statement The mission of NSU—a selective, doctoral-research university—is to deliver innovative academic programs in a dynamic, lifelong learning and research environment fostering integrity, academic excellence, leadership, and community service through engaged students, faculty, and staff. Core Values Integrity Academic Excellence Community Diversity Innovation Opportunity Scholarship/Research Student Centered Enhanced Vision 2020 to Vision 2025

6 The William and Norma Horvitz Administration Building

7 As a Carnegie Community Engaged institution, NSU offers its students a wide variety of opportunities to become fully engaged in the college experience. In accordance with this Carnegie Foundation classification, students are afforded opportunities to engage in collaborative teaching/learning/scholarship activities that enhance the well-being of the community and strengthen student civic commitment and academic learning. In this academically enriched environment, NSU’s students, at all degree levels, continue to excel in a variety of capacities, including their performance on state and national licensing examinations, where applicable. The university is committed to enhancing student performance, expanding student engagement in the life of the university community, and retaining students through the successful completion of the course of study. Accordingly, students are offered a wide array of opportunities for social, cultural, and academic engagement. Strategic Priority 1 ENHANCE STUDENT PERFORMANCE/ ENGAGEMENT/RETENTION 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

8 STUDENT PERFORMANCE/ENGAGEMENT/RETENTION PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress GRADUATION RATES Six-year, FTIC, FT freshmen (ICUF baseline: 53%; SUS baseline: 62%)1 36% 65% 62% Progress Three-year, transfer students from Florida state colleges (ICUF baseline: 65%)1 68% 75% 77% Meets/ Exceeds Target Five-year master’s and specialist degree programs2 68% 75% 71% Progress Eight-year doctoral degree programs2 54% 58% 60% Meets/ Exceeds Target Five-year professional degree programs2 91% 90% 91% Meets/ Exceeds Target LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION/NATIONAL BOARD PASSAGE RATES Percentage of applicable programs that meet or exceed their targets2 60% 90% 68% Progress RETENTION RATES Percentage of FTIC freshmen retained per year14 69% 80% 80% Meets/ Exceeds Target STUDENT ENGAGEMENT3 Percentage of UG students participating in the Honors College4 4.0% 10.0% 11.2% Meets/ Exceeds Target Percentage of unduplicated UG students who participate in NSU student organizations 29.3% 50.0% 35.2%* Progress 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap | Strategic Priority 1 The small note numbers refer to the endnotes in Appendix A on page 30. *Due to COVID-19, the 2019 data is presented as a better representation of NSU’s progress on this measure.

9 NSU’s highly credentialed faculty members support a broad academic perspective within their respective disciplines. Faculty research and scholarship, combined with depth of professional experience, enriches the classroom environment. NSU’s small, average, undergraduate class section size of 16 students both facilitates and enhances the engagement of students in the learning process and the establishment of an academically enriched faculty member/student relationship. NSU’s faculty “owns” the curriculum. Faculty member academic interests and pursuits ensure that the university offers programs exemplifying rigor, innovation, and responsiveness to disciplinary changes and needs. Faculty members at NSU are offered a wide variety of opportunities for professional development. Strategic Priority 2 ENHANCE FACULTY QUALITY 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

10 FACULTY QUALITY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT/FACULTY MEMBER RATIO FTE students: FT faculty member 22:1 13:1 17:1 Progress FULL-TIME FACULTY MEMBERS TEACHING UNDERGRADUATE COURSE SECTIONS Percentage of UG course sections taught by FT faculty members (ICUF baseline: 62%)1, 5 42% 70% 61% Progress Percentage of UG general education course sections taught by FT faculty members in the first two years of study5 61% 80% 68% Progress FACULTY MEMBER SCHOLARSHIP AND RESEARCH PRODUCTIVITY6 Annual number of grants/ contract proposals processed 175 225 214 Progress Annual number of external grants/contracts awarded 133 150 163 Meets/ Exceeds Target QUALITY OF PROGRAM FACULTY Percentage of programs reviewed through NSU’s Academic Program Review process that have demonstrated improvement or maintained adequate/excellent rating for program faculty7 63% 85% 75% Progress Strategic Priority 2 ENHANCE FACULTY QUALITY 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

11 SELECTED ACADEMIC PROGRAM QUALITY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress NSU ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW5 Percentage of programs reviewed through NSU’s Academic Program Review process that have demonstrated improvement or maintained adequate/excellent rating for program curriculum7 31% 60% 60% Meets/ Exceeds Target SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATION9 Number of professional programs that are eligible for specialized accreditation that are accredited 21 45 40 Progress Number of accredited program profession accrediting bodies through which NSU has accreditation 18 22 26 Meets/ Exceeds Target NSU maintains a rigorous academic program review process based on internal expectations established by the faculty. Program expectations are in accord with, or exceed, those established by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, through which NSU maintains regional accreditation; the standards of the specialized accrediting bodies, through which 39 of NSU’s academic programs are accredited; the standards of the Southern Regional Education Board, through which 83 of the university’s online programs are certified; the various regulations of the state and international education authorities that license, certify, and/or approve NSU’s programs to operate in other jurisdictions; and the requirements associated with the university’s Carnegie classifications. The level of research activity at NSU is classified by the Carnegie Foundation as Research University—High. NSU’s extensive community engagement activities are recognized by the Carnegie Foundation by the following designation: Curricular Engagement/Outreach/ Partnerships.8 NSU academic programs are complemented by an array of academic enrichment opportunities. In addition to traditional honors and dual admission programs, all of the university’s academic units participate in the Quality Enhancement Program, which is designed to improve student writing in all disciplines and at all degree levels. Strategic Priority 3 ENHANCE ACADEMIC PROGRAM QUALITY 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

12 NONTUITION FUNDING PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress CONTRIBUTIONS Cumulative gift commitments10 $10.8M $250M $318M Meets/ Exceeds Target TOTAL EXTERNAL FUNDING Cumulative grants/ contracts awarded11 $13.6M $300M $303.2M Meets/ Exceeds Target ALUMNI GIVING RATE Total annual alumni giving rate9 1.7% 3.0% 1.9% Progress EMPLOYEE GIVING RATE2 Total annual employee giving rate 8.6% 30% 36% Meets/ Exceeds Target ENDOWMENT Total endowed market value at year-end $46.0M $125M $132.2M Meets/ Exceeds Target Like many universities without a substantial endowment, NSU relies heavily upon tuition and fees from educational programs as the primary source of university income. The tuition dependency rate was 80 percent for FY2008–09, and currently is at 83 percent, with income from nontuition/fee sources, therefore, at 17 percent of total revenue. A concerted, university-wide effort is underway to identify new sources of nontuition revenue to enhance and increase existing sources, and to increase operational efficiencies. Strategic Priority 4 INCREASE NONTUITION FUNDING 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

13 INCOMING STUDENT QUALITY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress INCOMING SAT AVERAGE Average SAT total score for FTIC freshmen enrolled full time 1038 1200 1156 Progress TRANSFER STUDENT GPA Average GPA for full-time, incoming transfer students 2.8 3.0 3.2 Meets/ Exceeds Target NSU seeks continuous improvement in the academic preparation of incoming undergraduate students to participate in a competitive academic environment at the university and complete their program of study successfully. Reflecting this effort, the mean weighted high school grade point average (GPA) of incoming, first-time-incollege (FTIC) freshmen enrolled full time was 3.2 in 1995, had increased to 3.4 by 2001, had risen two more percentage points to 3.6 by 2009, and is currently at 4.0. Similarly reflective of NSU’s enhanced admission selection efforts, the mean combined SAT score for entering FTIC freshmen enrolled full time in 2004 was 998; for 2009, the combined score for this group had risen to 1038. As of the update, the mean combined SAT score is 1110. Strategic Priority 5 IMPROVE INCOMING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT QUALITY 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

14 RECRUITMENT PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress STUDENT ENROLLMENT9, 12 Total undergraduate student enrollment 6,174 5,700 6,314 Meets/ Exceeds Target Professional/graduate student enrollment 22,567 16,300 14,574 Decrease Total university enrollment 28,741 22,000 20,888 STUDENTS LIVING IN CAMPUS HOUSING Student housing occupancy rate 81% 90% 103%* Meets/ Exceeds Target Percentage of all entering undergraduate students residing on campus13 28% 60% 47%* Progress FIRST-TIME-IN-COLLEGE STUDENTS Percentage of all entering undergraduates that are first-time-in-college students13 46% 75% 77% Meets/ Exceeds Target DUAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS Number of undergraduate students participating in a Dual Admission Program 341 360 980 Meets/ Exceeds Target *Due to COVID-19, the 2019 data is presented as a better representation of NSU’s progress on this measure. NSU has experienced substantial enrollment growth since the university was established in 1964 and enrolled an initial class of 17 students in 1967. As the university pursues achievement of Vision 2020, targeted recruitment efforts will be focused on shifting the balance in representation among major cohort groups. In particular, the university seeks a number of strategic shifts in enrollment that will impact enrollment at the NSU regional campuses, enrollment of students living in campus housing, enrollment of international students, and enrollment of students in dual admission programs. Strategic Priority 6 ENHANCE TARGETED RECRUITMENT 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

15 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Target 2020 Actual Progress INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Number of international students at the undergraduate level 430 550 310* Decrease* Number of international students at the graduate level 1,035 1,100 605* Decrease* Number of international students at the professional level 232 240 212* Decrease* REGIONAL CAMPUS STUDENTS2 Number of students taking courses at the regional campuses 2,769 3,272 3,387* Meets/ Exceeds Target* Number of online students within the regional campus service areas 4,180 3,147 2,284* Decrease* Total 6,949 6,419 5,671* RECRUITMENT PERFORMANCE MEASURES (CONTINUED) *Due to COVID-19, the 2019 data is presented as a better representation of NSU’s progress on this measure. Strategic Priority 6 2010–2020 Strategic Priorities Recap

16

17 Original Statements Vision 2020 Statement By 2020, through excellence and innovations in teaching, research, service, and learning, Nova Southeastern University will be recognized by accrediting agencies, the academic community, and the general public as a premier, private, not-for-profit university of quality and distinction that engages all students and produces alumni who serve with integrity in their lives, fields of study, and resulting careers. Mission Statement The mission of Nova Southeastern University, a private, not-for-profit institution, is to offer a diverse array of innovative academic programs that complement on-campus educational opportunities and resources with accessible, distance-learning programs to foster academic excellence, intellectual inquiry, leadership, research, and commitment to community through engagement of students and faculty members in a dynamic, lifelong learning environment. Core Values Integrity Academic Excellence Community Diversity Innovation Opportunity Scholarship/Research Student Centered Enhanced Statements Vision 2025 Statement By 2025, NSU will be recognized as a preeminent, professional-dominant, doctoralresearch university that provides competitive career advantages to its students and produces alumni who serve and lead with integrity. Mission Statement The mission of NSU—a selective, doctoralresearch university—is to deliver innovative academic programs in a dynamic, lifelong learning and research environment fostering integrity, academic excellence, leadership, and community service through engaged students, faculty, and staff. Core Values Integrity Academic Excellence Community Diversity Innovation Opportunity Scholarship/Research Student Centered

18 NSU Core Value Descriptions Integrity Integrity involves honesty and fairness, consistency in instruction, ethics of scholarship, freedom of inquiry, and open and truthful engagement with the community through effective communication, policies and practices. Academic Excellence Academic excellence is the provision of the highest quality educational and learning experiences made possible by academically and professionally qualified and skilled instructional faculty and staff, opportunities for contextual learning, state-of-the-art facilities, beautiful surroundings, and effective resources necessary to support learning at the highest level. Additionally, academic excellence reflects the successful relationship between engaged learners and outstanding instructional faculty and staff. Community NSU is a community of faculty staff, students and alumni that share a common identity and purpose who engages with the university’s external community through diverse services, clinical programs, and community-based research and resources. Our community extends into professional, intellectual, as well as geographical domains that both support and are the focus of our educational mission. Diversity The dimensions of diversity include race, ethnicity, sex, age, physical characteristics, disability, religious affiliation, culture, veteran status, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and diversity of thought and personal beliefs with mutual respect for all. Diversity makes NSU a stronger university and enriches the learning and working environment of all members of the NSU community. Inclusive excellence is achieved through creating an enhanced level of consciousness about these dimensions and supporting the ongoing development and implementation of programs and initiatives so that students, faculty, and staff can be empowered to pursue their full potential and do their very best work. Innovation Innovation is the creative and deliberate application of teaching, research, scholarship and service for effective education, and the development of useful products or processes providing a value added to the community.

19 Opportunity Opportunity fosters the possibility for anyone associated with NSU to acquire an education or an educational experience through creative, yet sound pedagogical programs. Research and Scholarship Research and scholarship products are disseminated and evaluated through intellectual discourse, application, assessment, and other mechanisms of the relevant peer community. Student Centered Students are the focus of institutional priorities, resource decisions, and planning. We are stewards of student needs and advocates for student academic success and professional development. NSU Core Value Descriptions

20 Strategic Priority 1 STUDENTS Introduction Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals NSU strives to prepare its students to dominate the professional world by creating a competitive academic environment that challenges them and ensures they are successful in completing their chosen program and can contribute to their lives, their careers, and their communities. In the last decade, NSU improved retention for first-time-in-college (FTIC) students by 11 percent. During this same period, the FTIC graduation rate jumped from 36 percent to 61 percent. At the graduate and professional level, NSU has improved the student experience in the last decade by nearly doubling the specialized accreditation for professional programs, as well as by increasing the number of accrediting bodies through which NSU is accredited.

21 2010-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Average High School GPA Open Enrollment 4.00 4.00 SAT Average 1038 1156 1200 1.1. ENHANCE STUDENT QUALITY 2010-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target FTIC Retention 69% 80% 88% Master’s/Specialist Retention 62% 57% 62% Doctoral Retention 82% 83% 85% Professional Retention 89% 94% 93% Number of professional programs that are eligible for specialized accreditation that are accredited 21 40 43 Number of accredited program profession accrediting bodies through which NSU has accreditation 18 26 28 1.2. ENHANCE STUDENT EXPERIENCE 2010-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Graduation rate of six-year, FTIC, FT freshman (ICUF baseline: 53%; SUS baseline: 62%)1 36% 61% 72% Graduation rate for five-year master’s and specialist degree programs2 68% 71% 75% Graduation rate for eight-year doctoral degree programs2 54% 60% 60% Graduation rate for five-year professional degree programs2 91% 91% 90% Percentage of applicable programs that meet or exceed their targets for licensure/ certification/national board passage rates2 60% 68% 80% Total annual alumni giving rate9 1.7% 1.9% 6.0% Undergraduate alumni giving 1.2% 3.4% 6.0% 1.3. ENHANCE STUDENT OUTCOMES Strategic Priority 1 STUDENTS Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

22 Strategic Priority 2 PHILANTHROPIC RESOURCES Introduction 2010-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Endowment fund market value $46.0M $132.2M $300.0M Cumulative gift commitments10 $10.8M $318.0M $500.0M Total annual employee giving rate 9% 36% 50% NSU, like many universities that lack substantial endowments, relies mainly on tuition and fees from academic programs as a primary income source. Thanks to Vision 2020, NSU increased its endowed market value from $46 million in 2010 to more than $132 million in 2020. In the last decade, cumulative gift commitments rose from $10.8 million to more than $318 million, and the annual employee giving rate climbed from 8.6 percent to 36 percent. Through these improvements and the enhanced targets for Vision 2025, NSU will continue to diversify its sources of income and reduce reliance on tuition and fees. Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

23 Strategic Priority 3 SCHOLARSHIP AND RESEARCH Introduction *The citation impact score by Web of Science measures the number of times a publication citation is cited by other publications indexed in the Web of Science database. This impact score is normalized by content area. Further detail can be located at bit.ly/CitationIndicators. **Research expenditures include both internally and externally funded research and both recovered and unrecovered indirect costs, as defined by, and reported to, the National Science Foundation. 2010-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Number of publications indexed by the Web of Science per year 324 538 630 Citation impact score by Web of Science* 1.02 2.19 ≥ 2.00 Cumulative grants/contracts awarded11 $13.1M $303.2M $500.0M Research and development expenditures** $10.1M $26.0M $30.0M NSU is classified as a “high research activity” doctoral university by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. This distinction reflects the high standards that NSU sets for research and scholarship. The expertise and academic interests of our faculty members mean that students are academically engaged both in and out of the classroom, which enhances their educational experience. NSU’s scholarship casts a wide net, including the natural and social sciences, the health professions, law, business, education, the arts, computing and engineering, and psychology. The value of faculty research expanded tremendously through Vision 2020, with cumulative grants/contracts awarded shooting up from $13 million in 2010 to more than $303 million in 2020. The research conducted at NSU will provide lasting benefits to the local community and to the world, which is why the university is aiming even higher for 2025. Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

24 Strategic Priority 4 COMMUNITY SERVICE Introduction 2020–2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Carnegie designates as a Community Engaged University Achieved Achieved Achieved (through 2026) The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education classifies colleges and universities based on empirical data relating to the institution size and mission. Institutions may submit applications to receive the elective classification of Community Engagement. Although NSU’s strategic business goal is to maintain the Carnegie designation as a Community Engaged Institution, the reader should understand this is made up of a multitude of measures quantifying NSU’s commitment to community engagement, from tracking numbers of participants in events on all of our campuses, to participation on community boards and organizations, to financial support, and many others. The most recent application shared more than 100 pages of data about NSU’s community engagement. Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

From left: First-year students Charles De La Rosa and Harsh Patel (first-year Executive Board vice president) distribute PPE packages at Broward Health.

26 Strategic Priority 5 BELONGING, EQUITY, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION Introduction NSU’s students and faculty and staff members reflect the broad spectrum of diversity in race, ethnicity, religious affiliation, sex, veteran status, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, and age, in addition to diversity of thought and personal beliefs. Indeed, NSU enjoys longstanding recognition from the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-serving institution. NSU is committing to being aspirational and intentional in developing its first institutional diversity strategic plan. The first step in this process was to solicit input from the members of our community through distribution of a diversity engagement survey (DES) to all students and faculty and staff members. The survey was conducted by D.L. Plummer and Associates, a leading consultant in the field. The survey results place NSU within the top tertile of the hundreds of universities, academic medical centers, and businesses comprising the DES benchmark data. This positive showing reflects the inclusive atmosphere of diversity that has been created over the years at NSU and the strong and meaningful diversity work being undertaken by students and faculty and staff members, primarily at the grassroots level. The next steps will be to engage a task force of university stakeholders in creating a belonging, equity, diversity, and inclusion (BEDI) statement and brand for NSU. The goal is to identify and support current diversity initiatives among student groups, colleges, and administrative units; promote those initiatives that may have university-wide application; and develop new BEDI initiatives that create an enhanced level of consciousness and positive impact across the NSU community. The collective results of these and other efforts will assist in forming NSU’s diversity strategic plan and its implementation. Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

27 From left: First-year students Charles De La Rosa and Harsh Patel (first-year Executive Board vice president) distribute PPE packages at Broward Health. 2020-2025 Performance Measure 2010 Baseline 2020 Actual 2025 Target Diversity as an NSU core value Approved as a core value by the NSU Board of Trustees in 2010 Reaffirmed as a core value by NSU Board of Trustees in spring 2021 Achievement of additional outcomes outlined below Diversity engagement survey overall favorable response rate Survey not developed until 2011 77% 80% Create BEDI Advisory Board NSU Inclusion and Diversity Council formed as a grassroots effort by the NSU community In progress, the former Inclusion and Diversity Council is transforming into the BEDI Advisory Board with a more formal reporting structure to the president and provost Board to be formed by August 2021 Create BEDI university statement Nondiscrimination statements are published in student catalogs and on the NSU website In progress Statement completed and approved by university leadership by December 2021 Additional BEDI initiatives and target outcomes will be developed by the BEDI Advisory Board going forward. Significant achievements will be reported in future updates to the NSU Strategic Business Goals. Strategic Priority 5 BELONGING, EQUITY, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION Vision 2025 Strategic Business Goals

28 NSU PROGRAM PREEMINENCE STATEMENT FOR STRATEGIC BUSINESS GOALS 2025 A preeminent program makes outstanding contributions to NSU’s Strategic Business Goals and enhances the university’s reputation nationally and/or internationally. In support of NSU’s Vision 2025, each college’s dean and faculty have identified at least one program that they are targeting to improve to a preeminent status by the end of 2025. In order to demonstrate program preeminence, each dean submitted a report documenting program achievements to a committee consisting of deans, the provost, and the president for review and approval. Evidence of preeminence may include, but is not limited to, • program rankings by highly respected external agencies using sound methodologies • licensure exam performance • program accreditation • student achievements (e.g., retention rates, graduation rates, student awards, student publications) • student and/or faculty member scholarship and research • faculty achievements (e.g., fellowships, editorships of journals, outstanding contributions within their field, leadership positions within professional organizations, awards.) Aspirational Preeminent Program Goals for Deans and Colleges

29

30 Program Measure 2020 Actual 2025 Target Abraham S. Fischler College of Education and School of Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Exceptional Student Education Florida Teacher Certification Exam First-Time Licensure Passage Rate Number of pipeline agreements that lead to a guaranteed job Use of cutting-edge teaching methods Unique curriculum that stands out in a positive way NSU Mean Average = 88% Florida State Mean Average = 77% NSU is the only university in Florida with a job guarantee; currently, NSU has 5 district partners providing this option Early integration of Mursion Simulation Experiences; NSU is 1 of only 15 universities, including Harvard, currently using this tool 3/1 Pathway allowing students to earn a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in 4 years NSU Mean Average = 95% Expand the guaranteed job offer partnership to 8 districts Increase enrollments in Mursion Simulation Experiences across courses Increase enrollment in 3/1 Pathway allowing more students to earn a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in 4 years College of Computing and Engineering Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Cybersecurity Management National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) designation National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CD) Program of Study (PoS) validation process, including new criteria around continuous improvement plans in process Achieve National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/ Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CD) redesignation College of Dental Medicine Research Preeminence National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) dental school rankings 34 of 69 (2019 actual)* *2020 rankings to be published in April 2021 Top third (23 of 69) College of Optometry Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) National Board of Examiners in Optometry Ultimate Passage Rate Ranking Faculty with additional degree, fellowship, and/or residency training Funded research in O.D. programs Top third (4 of 23) 98% $0.1M (4 of 14 private and 10 out of all colleges of optometry) Top third 100% $0.3M (2 of 14 private and 8 out of all colleges of optometry) College of Pharmacy Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) U.S. News & World Report Pharmacy Schools National Ranking American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy National Ranking 23 of 61 private pharmacy schools 21 of 45 private pharmacy schools Top third of all private pharmacy schools (20 of 61) Top third of all private pharmacy schools (15 of 45) Aspirational Preeminent Program Goals for Deans and Colleges

31 Program Measure 2020 Actual 2025 Target College of Psychology Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology Multiple Program-Related American Psychological Association (APA) Accreditations Psy.D. Program Accreditation by APA Psychology Services Center (PSC) Predoctoral Internship Program Accreditation by APA Consortium Predoctoral Internship Program Reaccredited Self-Study Submitted Self-Study Submitted All programs reaccredited Postdoctoral program achieves first-time accreditation Program expected to be 1 of 3 OR the only program in the nation to achieve this standing Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Allopathic Medicine Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) Accreditation U.S. News & World Report Ranking National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) Match Provisional Unranked No Matching Accredited Ranked by 2025/2026 NRMP will match NSU MD students Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine (KPCOM) Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) Multiple KPCOM program certifications Percentage of resident placement Gain entry into Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Certifications 98% (Above national average of 92%) Currently, osteopaths are not allowed to join the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Not certified in the following programs: Bachelor of Science in Health Informatics, Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Coaching, Bachelor of Science in Public Health, Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics, and Registered Dietitian Continue to place residents at greater than national average Gain full admittance to Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Achieve certification for uncertified programs: Bachelor of Science in Health Informatics, Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Coaching, Bachelor of Science in Public Health, Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics, Registered Dietitian Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences Master of Science (M.S.) in Anesthesia National Commission for Certification of Anesthesiologist Assistants (NCCAA) Passage Rate Ranking 100% (#1 passage rate in the nation) Maintain 100% passage rate and ranking while expanding to two or more new program locations Farquhar Honors College National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) criteria Fulfill 70% of national criteria (21 of 30) Fulfill 90% of national criteria (27 of 30) Aspirational Preeminent Program Goals for Deans and Colleges

32 Program Measure 2020 Actual 2025 Target Halmos College of Arts and Sciences and the Guy Harvey Oceanographic Research Center Marine and Environmental Sciences H-Index* *A measure of both the number and impact/ citation of research and scholarly publications Median = 16.5 Median ≥ 18** **Multiple analyses have found researchers at top institutions to have median h-indices of 18–25 H. Wayne Huizenga College of Business and Entrepreneurship Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) Online Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation (only 5% worldwide) Uniform Certified Public Accountant Examination (CPA Exam) Passage Rate Ranking U.S. News & World Report Ranking (Initial Self-Evaluation Report) iSER report accepted 15 of 18 (36.1% passage rate) Mean and range for Florida universities: 61.8%, 28.6%–93.0% 210 Accredited Top third in Florida (75% passage rate, approximately) Top third (108) Ron and Kathy Assaf College of Nursing Entry Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) National Council Licensure Exam-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) Passage Rate 83.2% 95% (Top third of accredited schools of nursing in Florida) Shepard Broad College of Law Legal Research and Writing Program Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program Advocacy Program Health Law (M.S.) Program U.S. News & World Report Ranking Bar Examination Passage U.S. News & World Report Ranking U.S. News & World Report Ranking 18 67.4% of first-time takers passed, which is less than the 71.2% average for 11 Florida law schools 50 54 Top 15 Bar passage rate above average for 11 Florida law schools Top 40 Top 40 University School (JK–12 college preparatory school) Middle School Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) 8/9 scores—a precursor to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) (a percentile score vs. a nationally representative population) 69th percentile 75th percentile Aspirational Preeminent Program Goals for Deans’ Colleges and Headmaster’s School

33

34 Appendix Endnotes 1 ICUF refers to the Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida. SUS refers to the State University System. 2 This measure was added in the 2017 update. 3 Previous iterations of the Strategic Business Plan included the number of unduplicated undergraduate students who participate in registered community activities. Further scrutiny of this measure indicated that graduate students were likely included in some counts and tracking of student participation in voluntary activities may not be accurate. Therefore, it has been removed. 4 Measures were converted from raw numbers to percent of undergraduate enrollment to account for enrollment changes. The National Collegiate Honors Council has established a “best practice” that an honors community (program or college) should serve 10 percent of the undergraduate enrollment at that institution. This marker represents work with a student population that is clearly high performing within each institution, yet also assures a large enough community to reflect the breadth, diversity, and values of the entire institution. NSU has adopted this 10 percent benchmark for 2020. 5 Targets were increased, baseline was adjusted, and a new measure was added in the Addendum to the Strategic Plan approved by the Board of Trustees, November 17, 2014. 6 Funding levels are addressed under Strategic Priority 4: Increase Nontuition Funding. 7 Academic Program Review encompasses a set of systematic, integrated review and assessment processes for facilitating and ensuring academic program quality. These measures were revised to focus on program improvement in the 2017 update. 8 Carnegie Classifications are derived from institutional characteristics and activities from such sources as the National Center for Education Statistics, the National Science Foundation, and the College Board. The Community Engagement classification reflects an institution engaged in mutually beneficial and collaborative teaching/learning/scholarship activities addressing “community-identified needs, deepening students’ civic and academic learning, enhancing community well-being, and enriching the scholarship of the institution.” (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching).

35 Appendix Endnotes 9 These targets were updated in 2017. 10 Baseline is 2008–2009. Please note that the 2020 target for this measure refers to December 31, 2020. 11 The originally published baseline for the amount of grants/contracts awarded has been amended to represent the total number of new grants/contracts awarded during FY2009. Please note that the 2020 target for this measure refers to December 31, 2020. 12 Student enrollment has declined from the baseline in 2010 due to increases in undergraduate admissions standards, as well as market challenges in several programs. At the time of the 2017 update, the 2020 targets were revised to reflect more realistic aspirational enrollment based on statistical projections and market knowledge from the deans. 13 These measures were added or adjusted and approved by the NSU Board of Trustees as of November 17, 2014. 14 NSU met the original target of 80% in 2014, subsequently the Board approved increasing the target to 85%. This publication reflects the original target of 80%.

Notes

37 0634-2021 SAT

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NDE4MDg=