Contact Information

Office of International Affairs
Nova Southeastern University
Horvitz Admin. Bldg, 2nd Floor
3301 College Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33314

(954) 262-7240
800-541-6682, ext. 27240
intl@nova.edu

Office Hours
Monday thru Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. EST

YOU ARE WELCOME HERE

You Are Welcome Here

#YouAreWelcomeHere is a welcome message from U.S. higher education to international students around the world. View NSU's video here. 

FILC

Florida International Leadership Conference

Welcome to the Office of International Affairs

Photo: The Office of International AffairsThe Office of International Affairs (OIA) at Nova Southeastern University fosters campus internationalization and serves as a central support, advisory, and information center for all students. The OIA also collaborates with faculty and staff on campus, at our Regional Campuses, and our international instructional sites to promote and facilitate international education programs and initiatives, celebrate diversity, promote multiculturalism, and create opportunities for students that encourage the development of a global mindset.

Photo: Office of International Students and Scholars Photo: Travel Study and Study Abroad

Current News and Events

What Foreign Nationals Need to Know About the Travel Ban

June 29, 2017

Executive Summary

The travel ban will be enforced against certain nationals of six restricted countries and against refugees, but there are broad exemptions for U.S. visa holders, lawful permanent residents, persons with valid advance parole and those with a bona fide relationship to a person or entity in the United States.

As of 8pm EDT today, President Trump's travel ban executive order is in force against certain nationals of six restricted countries and refugees.

The ban is being put in place in the wake of a Supreme Court decision Monday to allow the Trump Administration to partially enforce the ban, but to exempt foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship to an entity or person in the United States. Most employer-sponsored foreign nationals should be exempt.

  1. Who is subject to entry restrictions?

    Unless exempt or granted a waiver, nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen and refugees from any country are subject to the travel ban and will be prohibited from entering the United States for the duration of the ban. Nationality is determined by the passport a traveler presents to enter the United States.
  2. How long will the entry ban be in effect? Could it be expanded to other countries?

    Unless exempt or granted a waiver, nationals of the six restricted countries will be barred for 90 days and refugees will be barred for 120 days. The entry ban could be extended beyond these timeframes.

    The Trump Administration is in the process of conducting a worldwide visa security review and could impose travel restrictions on other countries depending on the results of the review.
  3. Who is exempt from the travel ban?

    According to the Department of Homeland Security, the travel ban does not apply to foreign nationals who were inside the United States as of June 26, 2017, who had a valid U.S. visa as of 8pm EDT on June 29, 2017 or who had a valid U.S. visa as of 5pm EST on January 27, 2017. No visas will be revoked solely on the basis of the travel ban. After their visa expires or they leave the United States, these foreign nationals will not be subject to the ban when they apply for a new visa or reentry, though they must still meet all admissibility requirements as usual.

    The following groups of foreign nationals are also exempt:
    1. U.S. lawful permanent residents (green card holders); if you are applying for an immigrant visa to come to the United States as a permanent resident, see Question 6. 
    2. Dual nationals traveling on a valid passport from a non-restricted country and a valid U.S. visa (unless visa-exempt);
    3. Applicants for adjustment of status with a valid advance parole document;
    4. Foreign nationals with a valid A, C-2, G or NATO visa;
    5. Foreign nationals granted asylum;
    6. Refugees already admitted to the United States and those with travel formally scheduled by the State Department; 
    7. Persons who have been granted withholding of removal, parole or protection under the Convention Against Torture; and
    8. Foreign nationals with a bona fide relationship to a person or entity in the United States (see Questions 4-8).
  4. Are foreign students subject to the travel restrictions?

    If you are a national of a restricted country and have been admitted to study at a U.S. school, you should qualify for an exemption and be able to obtain an F-1 or J-1 visa based on your bona fide relationship with the school, provided you are otherwise eligible. Your spouse and children under the age of 21 should be able to obtain dependent visas to accompany or join you.

    Even if you qualify for an exemption from the ban, you should expect close questioning by U.S. consular officials. Enhanced security screening is likely, and the wait time for your visa could be lengthy.

    This alert is for informational purposes only.