Town Hall Meeting Q&A

Dr. Hanbury speaking with students at the Jacksonville Campus Dr. Hanbury speaking with students at the NSU Main Campus Don Taft University Center Dr. Hanbury speaking with students at the Jacksonville Campus Dr. Hanbury speaking with students at the Jacksonville Campus

2013 Town Hall Meeting Q&A

The following question was answered by Marc Crocquet, VP of Business Services:

At this stage we are only in an exploratory phase, examining space needs and early budget forecast for the project.  In short, the business center would offer: public copiers, printers, fax, mail and FedEx shipping, and act as a storefront for the copy center’s many high end services:  Banners, posters, binding, reports, high volume color, laminating, etc…

The following questions were answered by Dr. Brad Williams, VP of Student Affairs and Dean of Undergraduate Studies:

We will do a survey to determine if there is student interest and that they would be willing to pay for this service.

"P-cards", which are purchasing cards whereby students can come to the student accounts office and order supplies online, are in the process of implementation.  The university cannot issue credit cards to clubs due to fraud liability.

Greek Life dedicated space is important and currently does not exist.  An alternative would be to create next residence hall with ‘Greek style suites’ which serve in place of fraternity/sorority housing.  This will be driven by enrollment demands.

I am meeting with my team this morning to discuss this to make certain it does not happen again.  We are, indeed, ‘student-centered’

The following question was answered by Dr. Gay Holliday, Associate Dean of Student Affairs

At NSU, the term “harassment” would be used in place of “social bullying” The university currently consistently responds to and investigates all reports of harassing (bullying) behavior made involving students that take place on or off campus, person to person, or through social media sites, web pages, email, texting, or phone conversations.

The NSU Student Handbook 2013-2014 contains a policy that prohibits harassing behaviors and prohibits the use of cellular phones and other electronic devices to post photos, videos, voice recordings, etc. on web pages without the expressed consent of the subject(s) being photographed or recorded.  In addition if students are using the nova.edu website or their NSU email to engage in prohibitive behavior, they could be in violation of the NSU Acceptable Use of Computing Resources policies.  The specific policies prohibiting Harassment and the use of Cellular Phones can be found in the NSU Student Handbook on the university web page at: https://www.nova.edu/publications/ustudenthandbook/.

All reports of harassing behavior should be made to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs through email at gayhol@nova.edu or by calling 954-262-7281.

The following question was answered by Dr. Richard Dodge, Dean of the Oceanographic Center:

Fieldwork opportunities are offered as part of many Oceanographic Center (OC) graduate courses in the MS, MA, and PhD programs.  Undergraduate courses are not offered by the Oceanographic Center. However, we are indeed expanding undergraduate courses at the OC with shuttles. We are currently examining options to increase field opportunities for graduate students in the mix of providing a balanced curriculum. We are also mindful that there is an increase in student costs that usually accompany increased field courses.   We have added and continue to add field and laboratory courses in response to both student requests and faculty determined need relative to the curriculum. Field courses per se are not designed to enhance the immediate marketability of the graduate or to provide job training. Rather, field courses in the marine sciences are a component to educate the student in specific and diverse subjects. We are also seeking to grow the number of our faculty and researchers, within budget constraints, at the OC to be able to increase both field and laboratory research opportunities for students.

The following question was answered by Dr. Honggang Yang, Dean of SHSS:

In the Dept. of Conflict Analysis & Resolution (DCAR) at SHSS, there are courses that include both masters and doctoral students.  In addition to the differences between the graduate degrees, there are also different learning outcomes and course assignments (e.g., number, length and depth of requirements; more rigorous assessments…). Faculty are expected to provide clear indication in the syllabi, with regard to the doctoral-level learning outcomes and related assignments.  I’ll follow up more with DCAR to ensure the consistency and clarity of such distinctive details.

The following questions were answered by Dr. Rosenblum, Dean of Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences:

College faculty and program leadership have been asked to review the schedules of course offerings and take the following actions:

  • In addition to the published listing of course frequency, a description of frequency will be included in the course description in the catalog;
  • Infrequently offered courses will be reviewed by faculty and, in some cases, will be removed from the catalog.  In light of lower enrollments, it may be necessary to reduce variety of offerings.

Low enrollment degree programs will be reviewed for discontinuation.

Course caps are placed reflecting classroom capacity, lab safety protocols, and appropriate instructional (teaching and learning) conditions.  There are limits on available classroom spaces (and available qualified instructors).  When demand exceeds supply, program directors may add an additional section (subject to space and instructor availability).  Priority is usually placed on required classes, not electives.

Program directors will evaluate petitions from students who must have a specific class in order to graduate.  With assistance from academic advising, this review may result in raising a cap if the student has been responsible in timely action on course request and has followed a reasonable course plan.

Adding more faculty and more classroom space will be a long term strategy to reduce students from being “closed out.”  Reducing curriculum variation may also support this concern (although may result in less attractive options for students).

A course may be cancelled if demand is very low.  Courses will always run with 10 or more students.  Required courses will often run with five or more students.  Courses will rarely run with fewer than five students.

When a course is cancelled, the student is notified and offered alternatives to the course.  Academic advising staff is involved to help the student revise a curriculum plan to fulfill degree requirements within a normal time frame.  Program directors may also consider course substitutions and curriculum waivers – satisfying program outcomes – to facilitate student progress to degree.

The following questions were answered by Dr. Stephanie Brown, VP of Enrollment and Student Services:

Yes, the Registrar’s Office will look into expanding the Time Ticketing (priority) Registration system.  Generally, registration opens approximately two months before the start of the semester or term with the exception of the fall semester for undergraduate and law students which open in March/April.  Currently, several academic programs use time ticketing registration.       

The academic and administrative calendars are scheduled and made available to the deans and administrators for planning purposes through the 2014-2015 academic year.  As the Registrar’s Office begins scheduling the academic and administrative calendars for 2015-2016 and beyond, they will discuss time ticketing registration with those academic programs that do not currently use this system.

Veteran students are advised by the Sr. Financial Aid Counselor/Veteran Benefits Administrator regarding their benefits, registration, and financial aid.  In order to receive the full Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) each month, undergraduate students must be enrolled in 12 (or more) credits per semester/term.  This enrollment must include at least one ground-based class.  The full BAH is $1,950 per full month (otherwise prorated if not a full month).  If all classes are online, the full BAH is $750. 

The certification of enrollment for BAH can be done in various scenarios as follows:

16-week semester – 100% of BAH

  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 12 credits the entire 16-week semester (August – December).  He or she would receive 100% of BAH for the fall semester.

Two 8-week parts-of-term (POT) – 100% of BAH

  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 6 credits the first POT (August – October) and 6 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she would receive 100% of BAH for the first POT and 100% of BAH for the second POT.
  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 9 credits the first POT (August – October) and 6 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she would receive 100% of BAH for the first POT and 100% of BAH for the second POT.
  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 6 credits the first POT (August – October) and 9 credits the second POT (October – December).   He or she would receive 100% of BAH for the first POT and 100% of BAH for the second POT.

Two 8-week parts-of-term (POT) – Less than 100% of BAH

  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 9 credits the first POT (August – October) and 3 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she will receive 100% of BAH during the first POT and 60% of BAH during the second POT.
  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 3 credits the first POT (August – October) and 9 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she would receive 60%of BAH during the first POT and 100% of BAH during the second POT.
  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 6 credits the first POT (August – October) and 3 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she will receive 100% of BAH during the first POT and 60% of BAH during the second POT.
  • The undergraduate student is enrolled in 3 credits the first POT (August – October) and 6 credits the second POT (October – December).  He or she will receive 60% of BAH during the first POT and 100% of BAH during the second POT.

Note:  Online only students are subject to the same 100%/60% split as described above.

The following question was answered by Peter Witschen, VP for Facilities and Public Safety:

NSU does not currently charge for parking on campus.  NSU does, however, enforce parking rules and regulations on campus which are posted on the NSU website for the safety and equity of all NSU community members and guests.  The idea of exchanging service for monetary amounts owed will be examined further under the lens of human resources, tax, and student financial aid implications.  Please see following link for parking and traffic policy: http://www.nova.edu/publicsafety/parking/index.html.