News & PR

Featured News:

Nova bringing staghorn reef restoration to Lauderdale By The Sea

See the article...

Sir Richard Branson Blogs about Large Pelagics Research Center (UMass) and NSU-GHRI collaborative sailfish tracking program: From a close shave to a Necker visit: a sailfish's journey.

After a sailfish nearly took my eye out, I have a whole new appreciation for this magnificent species. Now, in a ground-breaking tracking research programme, we are learning lots more about sailfish.  SailfishVery little is known about the habits of most species in the ocean, and the more we can learn and understand, the more we can do to help protect these beautiful creatures.

With this in mind, Guy Harvey, Dr. Molly Lutcavage of the Large Pelagics Research Center and their teams started a programme to track mako sharks, tiger sharks, oceanic whitetip sharks, sand tiger sharks and blue marlin as well as sailfish. Virgin Unite is among the proud partners of this excellent project, sponsoring six sailfish.

See the article...

Hollywood students enjoy Ocean STEM Summer Camp

While many of their classmates are relaxing by the ocean, some Hollywood students spent the early part of their summer learning about it.

As part of South Broward High School's marine magnet program, students spent two weeks at the Ocean STEM Summer Camp for hands-on learning.

"It's a greater experience than just being in the classroom," said senior Brittany Sheflin. "It's more fun and we do learn a lot. Camp is a more interesting experience."

See the article...

Students Get a Hands On Experience with Sharks

As part of the OSTEM project, researchers from the Guy Harvey Research Institute take South Florida high school students shark tagging.

See the article...

Lawyers dive to restore coral reefs

During the week, they draft briefs, argue motions and negotiate corporate deals.

DivebarBut in their off-hours, these South Florida lawyers, judges and other legal professionals strap on flippers and dive into the ocean, just seeing the sights or doing volunteer work to improve the marine environment.

The 130 or so members of the group DiveBar have tagged sharks for the University of Miami and sponsored conservation research at Nova Southeastern University. Now in their most ambitious effort yet, they are working with NSU to build a living coral reef on what was once a barren stretch of rocky ocean floor off northern Fort Lauderdale.

See the article...

Guy Harvey's picture-perfect fishing trip

With a doctorate in marine zoology and a gift for drawing and painting fish, birds and mammals, Guy Harvey is combining his love of science and art these days to help sharks.

The popular wildlife artist, whose work appears on everything from murals and posters to clothing and coffee cups, is busy through the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation spreading the word about the importance of protecting sharks throughout the world.

See the article...

Mako Shark Tagging in Ocean City MD

Mako Shark Tagging with the GHRI

A 22-year-old bitten in the leg by a shark in a rare attack recounted her ordeal.

Jessica Vaughn hesitated to get into the water because it was “dark and murky.”

“I didn’t like that I couldn’t see what was in there,” the 22-year-old said Monday as she clutched a toy stuffed dolphin.

See the article...

World's Largest Marine Park: Mapping the Blue

In 2012 the Cook Islands announced the largest Marine Park on Earth. In stunning 4K imagery this film tells the story of how Kevin Iro, founder of the park, and his team use a high tech GIS system to designate multi-use areas inside the pristine park.

See the article...

Lionfish Invasion:

Can a bounty on their heads bring this invasive species to heel? What if we could get them off the reefs and onto a dinner plate?

The lionfish, a colorful Asian aquarium star that has invaded Florida waters, may soon have a price on its head. The Legislature allocated $427,000 in its recently concluded session to start a bounty program for the exotic fish.

See the article...

What's killing Florida's Coral Reefs?

They are breath taking, mesmerizing, but in the next few decades, will likely be gone.

CBS12's Jeff Berardelli gets to the bottom of what's killing Florida's coral reefs. 

Tourists flock to our beautiful beaches, but it's what's under the sea that divers want to see.

"people come from all over the world all over the country to dive here."

Gary Thomas and Jeff Torode have both spent a good part of their lives underwater, exploring our coral reefs. Their lively hoods depend on them - but the reefs are dying.

See the article...

Local 10's Jacey Birch goes underwater to see how coral reefs are being rebuilt

South Florida is a tourist utopia for sand, sun and fun, but what you don't see is what is happening below the surface with precious reefs at risk, some wiped out by disease.

See the article...

Great White Shark “Katharine” Swimming By South Florida

FORT LAUDERDALE (CBSMiami) – A ferocious visitor has made her way to South Florida – she’s swimming around about 25 miles off shore.

Satellite tracking shows “Katharine the Great White Shark” swimming her way south off the coast of Fort Lauderdale.

See the article...

Researchers Urge Caution When Exploiting The World’s Deep Oceans

Good Stewardship Is Vital for Sustainability for Future Generations – More Exploration and Understanding is Needed

FORT LAUDERDALE-DAVIE, Fla. – It has been said that we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about our own planet’s oceans. That especially applies to the deepest parts of our oceans – depths that are 200 meters or deeper.

Researchers from organizations around the world who specialize in studying and exploring the deepest regions of our oceans have come together to pen a cautionary tale that urges we take a critical look at how we’re treating our seas.

“We need to consider the common heritage of mankind - when do we have the right to take something that will basically never be replaced or take millions of years,” said Tracey Sutton, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Nova Southeastern University’s Oceanographic Center.

See the article...

A Tale of Two Sharks Mystery, Intrigue and History in the Making

Two sharks. Two species. And two different journeys that have kept marine scientists closely monitoring the migrations of these satellite tagged sharks for months—one for its place in history and the second for the way it continues to make history.

sharks

“Beamer”, a 200-pound blue shark, was caught by Blue Fin IV captained by Michael Potts last year off Montauk, New York during the nation’s first catch-satellite tag-and- all-release shark tournament named Shark’s Eye. Beamer made history that day last July when he was fitted with a SPOT (Smart Position Or Temperature) Tag and released. In fact, there were 64 sharks caught and released during Shark’s Eye, 33 makos and 31 blues. None were killed. (Shark’s Eye All-Release Tournament & Festival is returning to Montauk July 11-13.)

See the article...

GHRI Shark Tracking Website

GHRI Shark Tracking Website Featured on Swedish News Website

A Swedish news website featured a story about mako shark 'I-NSU' who is showing unusual movement patterns in the Atlantic ocean, driving thousands of hits to the GHRI website.   

See the article...

GHRI Shark Tracking Website

Billfish Tournament

By Sue Cocking The Miami Herald

Marlin release highlights tourney

The D & D, owned and skippered by Danny Massa won top team honors in Saturday’s one-day Fort Lauderdale Billfish Tournament with six sailfish releases. The four-man team aboard Ray Crawford’s Master Plan was runner-up in the billfish division with Roland Crawford’s release of a blue marlin estimated at 100 pounds.

A New Day topped the funfish division with 82 pounds of dolphin, including a 29.2-pounder caught by John Auerbach.

Read more...

Cracking mysteries of sharks

By Arelis R. Hernández, Staff Writer

Experts’ aim: Educate communities on coast about imperiled predators

She prefers t osummer in the glistening waters off Cape Cod. But come December, Katharine the great white shark travels more than a thousand miles to another tourist destination: Daytona Beach.

The 14-foot, 2-ton female is one of dozens of large marine predators scientists are now tracking—using satellite tags affixed to their dorsal fins—to peer into secret lives of sharks and their dramatic journeys north and south along the East Coast.

Read more...

Wet Suits: Scuba diving lawyers

Art Levy | 12/20/2013

David Black was 7 the first time he saw someone pull on a wet suit and jump into the Atlantic Ocean. Right then, scuba diving became his dream. Whenever someone asked him what he wanted to do when he grew up, Black said he planned to move to the Caribbean and become a diving instructor.

Oh, and he also wanted to be a lawyer.Divebar

Black followed through on both ambitions. After college, he moved to Grand Cayman and taught diving for a year before returning to the U.S. and enrolling at the Boston University School of Law.

Now a 32-year-old associate at Berger Singerman in Fort Lauderdale, Black still dives — as many as three times a month — and usually with fellow members of DiveBar, a 2-year-old south Florida-based group that calls itself the “first underwater Bar association for legal professionals.”

Read more...

Portuguese man-of-war (and their stings) return

By David Fleshler, Sun Sentinel
7:37 p.m. EST, February 3, 2014

Come to South Florida and experience the sun, the surf, the venomous tentacles of the Portuguese man-of-war.
It's the season for stinging blobs that resemble jellyfish to wash ashore, and purple warning flags were flying Monday at beaches in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.Man-of-war

The Portuguese man-of-war tends to be found off South Florida from late fall to early spring, said Charles Messing, professor at Nova Southeastern University's Oceanographic Center. When winds blow strongly toward shore, as they have in the past few days, the beaches become littered with the translucent gas bladders that are their most prominent feature (until they sting you).

Read more...

Research on Coral Hybridization at the Oceanographic Center

Abigail Renegar discusses coral hybridization with KTOO, a PBS station in Juneau, Alaska.

Read more...

Florida's coral reefs make a comeback

William E. Gibson, Washington Bureau
5:37 p.m. EST, November 6, 2013

WASHINGTON — South Florida's coral reefs, a natural wonder worth more than $6 billion to the local economy, appear to be rebounding after decades of damage, disease and deterioration.

The iconic reefs, which attract divers, boaters, marine scientists and fishermen from around the world, have been spared in recent years from major storms and ship groundings, allowing them to survive and even grow offshore.

NurseryA federal study released this month brought more good news: Coral reefs may be able to adapt to warmer sea temperatures. That's a sign they can withstand a limited degree of gradual global warming — but only if carbon emissions are restrained to prevent unhealthy extremes.

The findings raise hope for the survival of the recreational and economic resource, just as scientists and officials gather in Fort Lauderdale on Thursday and Friday for the fifth annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit. They will assess the costs and challenges of sea-level rise and global warming.

Read more...

Diving with the Coral Doctor - By David W. Shaw

 

It’s a beautiful autumn afternoon on the beach in South Florida’s Fort Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. Surfers enjoy the waves. Swimmers frolic in the warm water. On Anglin’s Fishing Pier, also known as Commercial Pier, fishing buffs go for snook, croaker, mackerel and cobia. About 200 yards offshore, a dive boat bobs in the swells, and Richard Dodge, dean of the Oceanographic Center of Nova Southeastern University in Hollywood, Fla., plunges into the sea to check on one of the university’s coral nurseries. “When I’m diving, I’m doing it for work, but it’s still fun. The reefs are beautiful,” Dodge says. “There are so many different kinds of animals and plants. It’s all very exciting, but for me the fascination is truly in working to better understand how these ecosystems function.”

Read more...

  

Archived Articles

2012
2011
2010 and older
B Y D A V I D W . S H A W