M.S. in Criminal Justice

Curriculum

The Master's program is comprised of 36 credits. The core curriculum is comprised of five courses (15 credits) and two elective courses (6 credits). The specialty concentrations are comprised of five courses (15 credits).

Core Courses (15 Credits)

This course will review historical context, theory, policy making, political factors, and behavioral influences related to criminal justice policy department.

This course will provide an overview of the federal, state, and local criminal justice systems. An introduction to management and methods of conflict management will be provided.

This course will provide an overview to the legal issues that govern criminal justice activities that will included state and constitutional perspectives of law. An historical development of the various statutes that regulate criminal justice activities will be provided.

This course will provide a fundamental analysis of research and methodology as related to evaluation of criminal justice administration. Included in this course will be an introduction to statistical analysis and the use of current technology.

This course will provide a fundamental background for investigative processes to include the responsibilities of the investigator from the initial crime scene all the way through follow-up. Felony cases will be used to demonstrate examples of criminal principles.

Specialty Concentrations (15 Credits)

Students must choose one concentration below and complete 15 credits within the concentration.

(Offered through the Shepard Broad Law Center)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialized training in the fundamentals of criminal law and procedure, criminal evidence and legal writing for the non-lawyer. It will also provide specific training regarding procedural and legal issues that affect the criminal justice system. It will offer an in-depth knowledge of criminal law and enable the criminal justice professional to interface with lawyers regarding legal issues that may arise during the criminal investigation. Consequently, the concentration will provide knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies, and related organizations and who are required to have a working knowledge of the theory and application of criminal law

CJI 6110 Criminal Evidence (3 credits)

This first course in the criminal justice concentration will offer students an in-depth analysis of the

Federal Rules of Evidence as a legal foundation for understanding criminal law and procedure.

Topics covered will include trial procedure, examination of witnesses, circumstantial evidence, opinion evidence, hearsay and character evidence, privileged communications, declarations against interests, presumptions and judicial notice.

CJI 6120 Advanced Criminal Procedure (3 credits)

This course will provide the criminal justice professional with an in-depth introduction to the role of the court, the law, and the judge. It will include the advanced study of the constitution with a specific focus on the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments. The impact of these provisions during a criminal investigation will be examined with a focus on arrest, warrants, Miranda, the right to counsel and the exclusionary rule

CJI 6130 Criminal Law (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the common law elements and principles of criminal law as a legal foundation for understanding the criminal justice system. It will include the study of substantive criminal law including offenses against persons and property, public morality, public health, public order and safety, and justice and public administration. Alcohol and drug offenses, white collar and organized crime and criminal responsibility and defenses will also be covered.

CJI 6140 Legal Research and Writing for Non-Lawyers (3 credits)

In this course the student will research, analyze and write about legal issues in the criminal justice system. This course is intended to assist the legal professional in recognizing the need for legal intervention and to identify relevant issues. Topics covered will include the fundamentals of case research, statutory law, administrative law, secondary sources, and electronic research.

CJI 6150 Selected Issues in Forensic and Social Science (3 credits)

This final course in the concentration is intended to offer the criminal justice professional an opportunity to conduct in-depth analysis of forensic and social science as an administrative tool for litigation.

Social Sciences in the law will enable the student to understand the interrelationship between the forensic science, social science and the admission of evidence. Topics covered will include social sciences as a basis for determining facts and making law.

(Offered through the Center for Psychological Studies)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the behavioral science issues, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies

CJI 6210 Law Enforcement and the Mentally Disordered Offender (3 Credits)

This course provides students with knowledge of the various forms of mental disorders and disabilities that law enforcement officers will likely see in people during their policing careers.

Understanding the origin of various forms of mental illness together with practical application for law enforcement officers in how to recognize techniques for handling victims and offenders will be addressed. Topics include distinguishing behavioral problems such as those caused by temporary situations such as grief or abuse impact from those of a long-lasting and pervasive impact from internal events like delusions and hallucinations, differentiating impulsive behavior caused by immaturity, bi-polar disorder, or brain dysfunction, understanding mental retardation versus psychotic behavior, figuring out who needs to be immediately taken to a detoxification center, and identifying those who might be attempting to avoid consequences of their violent behavior. Focus is also on helping law enforcement officers identify those who need to be deferred into specialty courts such as mental health, drug, and domestic violence courts as well as management of the mentally ill once they are detained. Victim impact will also be discussed.

CJI 6220 Police Psychology and Criminology (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to examine current strategies and issues in the field of police psychology. Specific topics that will be covered include: selection and fitness for duty evaluations, mental health issues in law enforcement (e.g., stress, family problems, critical incident debriefings, and domestic violence), role of psychology in crisis (hostage) negotiations, and supportive functions of the police psychologist in police operations. Tactical operations and police procedures relevant to the work of the police psychologist also will be covered.

CJI 6230 Behavioral Criminology (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with various techniques for analyzing and understanding criminal behavior through crime and crime scene analysis. These techniques include an introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigative analysis and profiling.

Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in crime and crime scene analysis in order to draw logical inferences regarding any underlying psychopathology, motive, criminal history or other dynamics unique to that particular offender.

CJI 6240 Police Stress and Mental Health (3 Credits)

This course provides and overview of stress management in law enforcement. The course will cover the physiological and psychological basis of the stress response. The physical, emotional, mental, rational, and spiritual signs of distress will be examined. Understanding, recognizing, and coping with the stressors associated with modern policing helps prevent maladaptive responses such as domestic violence and suicide. Lectures and case studies will emphasize the application of successful stress management techniques within a law enforcement context.

CJI 6250 Forensic Psychology (3 Credits)

This course will cover topics dealing with interaction of psychology and criminal law. Topics to be covered include: insanity, competency to stand trial, clinical assessment of dangerousness, delinquency, and the evaluation of malingering.

(Offered through the Wayne Huizenga Graduate School of Business and Entrepreneurship)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of business administration, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

CJI 6310 21st Century Management Practices (3 Credits)

Students will gain an understanding of leading state-of-the-art business theories and will be able to apply them to real-world situations. They will learn to understand and challenge the ideas of 20th century management thinkers, and to practice developing and challenging their own and applied models and paradigms.

CJI 6320 Legal, Ethical, and Social Values of Business (3 Credits)

Students will gain an understanding of the meaning and importance of the law, ethics, personal morality, and corporate social responsibility. They will exhibit moral, ethical, and socially responsible behavior, and will be able to analyze the business decisions from a legal, ethical, and social responsibility perspective.

CJI 6330 Managing Organizational Behavior (3 Credits)

Students will gain a working knowledge of how to manage personal, interpersonal, and group processes by having the interpersonal skills to assume responsibility for leading and promoting teamwork among diverse stakeholders. Students will learn to manage individual and group behaviors in improving organizational productivity and performance. Through experiential learning, students will learn to integrate home, work, and educational observations and experiences and to convert them into proactive practical applications for growth and renewal.

CJI 6340 Managing Human Resources (3 Credits)

Students will gain a working knowledge of planning, organizing, and managing human resource systems; and will gain hands-on abilities to design, direct, and assess human resource systems in enhancing relationships with internal and external customers, leading to organizational effectiveness.

CJI 6350 Delivering Superior Customer Value (3 Credits)

Students will learn to apply the customer-value paradigm in creating a market-driven culture that designs and delivers optimum long-term value to customers. They will examine strategies for optimizing and communicating customer value, measuring customer orientation, and building customer relationships; and will learn (using case analysis and exercises) how to blend the delivery of service and product quality with pricing strategies to maximize value.

(Offered through the Wayne Huizenga Graduate School of Business and Entrepreneurship)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of public administration, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

CJI 6410 Administrative Law and Ethics in the Public Sector (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to fundamental legal concepts regarding administrative law and the administrative process. The course also introduces students to the field of ethics and shows how ethical principles are applied to administrative agencies to ensure not only legal but also moral government decision-making. Administrative law is the body of law concerned with the actions of administrative agencies, frequently called the "4th branch of government" in the United States. The course thus examines how administrative agencies are created, how they exercise their powers, how they make laws and policy formally as well as informally, the laws that govern agency rulemaking and adjudications, especially the Administrative Procedure Act, Constitutional and other legal protections afforded against agency actions, and how agency actions are reviewed and remedied by the courts and legislative branch of government. The course also examines the intergovernmental relations and the political and practical constraints that influence administrative policy.

CJI 6420 Public Administration in Theory and Practice Application (3 Credits)

This course examines the role of public administration and not-for-profit organizations in a democratic society. Students examine the cultural and intellectual evolution of the field, the theories, forces, and people that drive the public sector and the specific management techniques used to implement public policy. Finally, attention is given to how public policies are developed and the institutions that governments use to implement those policies.

CJI 6430 Strategic Planning in the Changing Public Environment (3 Credits)

This course emphasizes two broad approaches to strategic planning: explicit planning and adaptive planning. Students develop a working knowledge of how to do planning in the public sector according to these two approaches. In the usual way, students learn about the SWOT method, but then much more is gained by studying how planning is actually carried out according to three adaptive perspectives and other ancillary and explicit approaches including learning theory and contingency theory. Students learn what went wrong in the Katrina disaster and what continues to go wrong. The question is put: Can Americans plan? Finally, students review how local community and economic development planning occurs through resort to charettes and public-private partnerships.

CJI 6440 Public-Sector Human Resource Management (3 Credits)

The political and institutional environment of public human resource management is examined. Emphasis is given to the challenges facing the public sector in attracting and developing human assets in an environment of conflicting goals, stakeholder obligations, and a highly aware electorate. Specific topics include the evolution of the modern public service, the functions of human resource management, employment discrimination, labor management relations, professionalism and ethics.

CJI 6450 Leadership in the Public Sector (3 Credits)

This course will explore the dimensions of leadership and decision making within the public sector. Students will explore the major theoretical frameworks of leadership as well as the relationship of leadership to organizational change and effective management strategies. Emphasis is given to assisting practitioners and students with in-depth reflection for self-development in such areas as decision-making, ethics, and emotional intelligence.

(Offered through the Fischler School of Education and Human Services)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the issues of substance abuse, providing knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

CJI 6510 Psychopharmacology of Illicit and Licit Drugs (3 Credits)

This course reviews the physical and psychodynamic effects of legal and illegal drugs. Mental disorders, symptomotology, assessment measures for addicts and dual diagnosis, along with a thorough examination of the DSM-IV.

CJI 6520 Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment in the Criminal Justice System (3 Credits)

This course will examine treatment and intervention approaches that are effective with the offenders in correctional settings. Such topics to be introduced are drug and alcohol treatment in correctional institutions, treatment modalities, principles of the therapeutic communities, characteristics and traits of the offender and issues related to the transition into the community.

CJI 6530 Substance Abuse Treatment in the Community (3 Credits)

This course introduces various models of community based programs for the substance abuse involved offender, research regarding factors of recidivism, treatment matching, case management, relapse prevention techniques, setting treatment goals, resources in the community and DUI and drug court operations.

CJI 6540 Cultural Factors in Treatment Associated with Substance Abuse Issues and the Criminal Justice System ( 3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to cultural and racial identity development, The impact that class, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation have on court disposition, sentencing and the correctional process, culturally specific treatment techniques, racial and sexual dynamics in institutional settings and in community programs, including knowledge of cross-cultural interviewing skills.

CJI 6550 Special Topics in Substance Abuse Services & Criminal Justice System (3 Credits)

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to research a specific topic related to substance abuse services and the Criminal Justice System. Students are expected to work in an independent fashion and engage in in-depth research through the use of various sources. Such sources may include journal articles, books, online resources, and other scholarly works as deemed appropriate by the instructor. Students will receive guidance from the instructor regarding topic selection, along with scope and focus of the required paper.

(Offered through the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences)

CJI 6610 Human Factors (3 Credits)

This course presents communication theories relevant to conflict resolution as well as theories about understanding, analyzing, and managing conflict. The course focuses on the human and emotional aspects of conflict, and includes the influence of gender and culture. This course is pragmatic as well as theoretical, and presents communication and conflict resolution models in a practice based approach.

CJI 6620 Critical Incidents Response (3 Credits)

This course will provide an in-depth analysis and understanding of intergroup and intra-group dynamics associated with the organizational response to critical incidents such as hostage/barricade management, terrorism, kidnapping, natural and other disasters, and tactical operations, which comprises the negotiations team, the tactical team, and the on-scene commander, as well as coordination of efforts with government, organizations, and the community. Topics include: intergroup and intragroup conflict intervention and communication strategies, negotiation, tactical, and command protocols, hostage/barricade resolution continuum options, and case studies.

CJI 6630 Conflict and Crisis Management Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

This course is an overview of the theories of conflict and crisis management and the intervention models and protocols used. Conflict and crisis management will be explored among and between individuals and groups, organizations, communities, and governments around the globe. Topics will include the management of violent conflicts, such as kidnapping, hostage-barricade and terrorist acts, homeland security, and the response to natural disasters. There will be interactive exercises as well as a case study approach used.

CJI 6640 Family Violence: The Effects on Families, Communities and Workplaces (3 Credits)

This course explores the overall effects of trauma and violence on individuals, families, communities, and the workplace. Issues of abuse, violence, and systemic responses are explored in relation to their effect on individual behavior, family dynamics, service provision, and community systems. Methods for identifying such issues in the context of family mediation and other types of conflict intervention are explored.

CJI 6650 Strategic Community Planning and Partnerships (3 Credits)

An overview of the community from a strategic perspective, identifying: social, economic, demographic and cultural trends and patterns within the community; areas of concern for law enforcement and government; ways to initiate and develop community-wide strategic planning for peaceful community relations and growth; building community partnerships between law enforcement, the criminal justice system and community agencies and groups; community justice; and the use of data, data collection and analysis in developing and implementing collaborative long and short term plans for community development, problem solving and funding initiatives.

CJI 6660 Race and Ethnic Relations in America (3 Credits)

This course examines the social constructionist approach toward the study of racial and ethnic conflict and conflict analysis in the U.S. It is designed to assist students in increasing their ability to analyze racial issues from a historical and contemporary perspective, and to explore the basic theoretical paradigms that have been used to conceptualize the idea of race and ethnicity from the 9th century to the present. The course will also explore the effects of contemporary policies in addressing racial and ethnic inequities, and strategies to combat racism.

CJI 6670 Metropolitan Conflict (3 Credits)

This course will explore historical and theoretical explanations for the different types of conflict prevalent in various metropolitan areas. A series of case studies, focusing on both cities within the United States and abroad, students will explore such topics as the role of ethnicity in conflict, structural inequalities of the system, urban/suburban relations, urbanization, and metropolitan growth and development.

CJI 6680 Transformational Narratives (3 Credits)

Across cultures, people effectively communicate about their conflicts and issues through narratives. In any helping profession, it is effective to create useful change with a clear understanding of the strategies of transformational narratives. By understanding what creates change in stories, we can help people rewrite their own accounts in ways that redefine their possibilities. This course offers analyses of narratives from traditions of conflict resolution and other interdisciplinary perspectives, promoting the ability to reframe, refocus, and creatively intervene in stories of a personal and social nature to open useful possibilities for people who carry stories of unresolved struggle.

CJI 6690 Federalism and Intergovernmental Conflict (3 credits)

This course describes and analyzes the guiding principles and the operational processes of American Federalism, as well as its intended and unintended consequences. It seeks to provide students with a working understanding of the complex set of interactions occurring between all government units and levels (national/federal, States, Counties, municipalities, school districts and special districts, townships, etc.) in the USA; the various types of conflicts which necessarily result from these interactions; and the solutions that have been implemented in the past, or are currently suggested, in order to address and resolve these conflicts.

(Offered through the Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will focus on the application of technological concepts of information systems to the collection, retention, and dissemination of information for management planning and decision making.

CJI 6710 Information Security Management (3 Credits)

Provides an understanding to implement effectively the information security vision and strategy set forth by the executive management. The emphasis will be on the management of an information security program. Focus is on the implementation of information security policy, information security planning, development of information security processes, and establishment of information security measures. Concepts and techniques from the management and organizational behavior disciplines will be integrated in order to identify and propose solutions to the problems of information security administration.

CJI 6720 Information Privacy and Ethics (3 credits)

Building on a foundation in classical ethics, we examine the impact of the computer and the Internet on our society. Topics include ethical decision making; professional codes; whistleblowing; computer crime; copyrights, patents and intellectual property; privacy; and risk management. Students analyze case studies and write a research paper.

CJI 6730 Electronic Commerce on the Internet (3 credits)

This course examines the foundation, operation, and implications of the Internet economy.

Topics include Internet technologies, online market mechanisms, interactive customers, knowledge-based products, smart physical products and services, pricing in the Internet economy, online auctions and e-marketplaces, digital governance, policies for the Internet economy and an outlook for the new economy.

CJI 6740 Database Systems (3 credits)

The application of database concepts to management information systems. Design objectives, methods, costs, and benefits associated with the use of a database management system. Tools and techniques for the management of large amounts of data. Database design, performance, and administration. File organization and access methods. The architectures of database systems, data models for database systems (network, hierarchical, relational, and object-oriented model), client-server database applications, distributed databases, and object-oriented databases.

CJI 6750 Telecommunications and Computer Networking (3 credits)

This course provides a framework for understanding computer network functionality, characteristics, and configurations. Topics include network topologies, protocols, and architectures and emerging trends in network technologies and services. The role of optical technologies in supporting national and international implementations is explored. Strategies for network planning, implementation, management, and security are introduced. Recent advances in standardization, internetworking, and deployment of LANs (local area networks), MANs

(Metropolitan area networks), and WANs (wide area networks) are introduced.

(Offered through the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in law enforcement conflict and crisis management, emphasizing nonviolent, negotiation-oriented approaches to both individual and organizational responses to hostage/barricade and other crisis situations. The concentration will provide knowledge and skills to those who work in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies, and related organizations.

CJI 6810/6620 Violence Prevention (3 Credits) (replaced 6910)

This course examines various theories of human aggression and violence, exploring their underlying assumptions about human nature and the causes of violence. Also included is an introduction to a range of violence intervention and prevention approaches developed for use at the interpersonal, intergroup, and societal level.

CJI 6820/6610 Human Factors (3 Credits) (replaced 6920)

This course presents communication theories relevant to conflict resolution as well as theories about understanding, analyzing, and managing conflict. The course focuses on the human and emotional aspects of conflict, and includes the influence of gender and culture. This course is pragmatic as well as theoretical, and presents communication and conflict resolution models in a practice-based approach.

CJI 6830 Conflict & Crisis Negotiation (3 Credits) (replaced 6930)

This course will provide an overview of law enforcement crisis negotiation and its application to crisis situations, such as domestic violence encounters on an individual level and hostage/barricade encounters on an organizational level. Lecture, expert demonstration, and interactive negotiation with role play will provide an experiential learning environment for understanding and applying active listening skills, empathy, rapport, influence, and behavioral change concepts to conflict and crisis situations.

CJI 6840 Conflict and Crisis Management Theory and Practice (3 Credits) (replaced 6940)

This course is an overview of the theories of conflict and crisis management and the intervention models and protocols used. Conflict and crisis management will be explored among and between individuals and groups, organizations, communities, and governments around the globe. Topics will include the management of violent conflicts, such as kidnapping, hostage-barricade and terrorist acts, homeland security, and the response to natural disasters. There will be interactive exercises as well as a case study approach used.

CJI 6850 Critical Incidents: Response, Management, and Resolution (3 Credits) (replaced 6950)

This course will provide an in-depth analysis and understanding of inter-group and intra-group dynamics associated with the organizational response to critical incidents such as hostage/barricade management, terrorism, kidnapping, natural and other disasters, and tactical operations, which comprises the negotiations team, the tactical team, and the on-scene commander, as well as coordination of efforts with government, organizations, and the community. Topics include: inter-group and intra-group conflict intervention and communication strategies, negotiation, tactical, and command protocols, hostage/barricade resolution continuum options, and case studies.

(Offered through the Fischler School of Education and Human Services)

Concentration Description:

This concentration is designed to meet the specific need of child protective workers, law enforcement officers, child advocates, school resource officers, community mental health workers, school police, Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Children and Family Services, and others.

CJI 6910 Theory of Child Protection, Investigation, and Advocacy (3 credits)

This course will focus on the interpretation of social and systemic policies and procedures of child welfare agencies and nongovernmental agencies with emphasis on child advocacy, due process, and institutional standards. Emphasis will also be included regarding the remediation, intervention, rehabilitation, education, and other services designed to reduce recidivism amongst children and their families.

CJI 6920 Juvenile Justice: Systems, Structure, and Process (3 credits)

This course will focus on the response of law enforcement and other professionals in the protection of children in trouble or in need of services. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the juvenile court as an institution, investigative process and forensic interview strategies needed to successfully classify and more accurately detect suspected child abuse, the policies and practices of agencies involved in processing children and youth through the juvenile justice system.

CJI 6930 Family Dynamics: Motivation, Support and Communication (3 credits)

This course will examine the protective and risk factors associated with the developmental pathways internalized by youth through interaction with their family system. Emphasis will be given to child and youth development as it is affected by the family system, peer groups, schools and teachers, community and other social influences. In addition, the dynamics of traditional, non-traditional and culturally diverse family construction in contemporary society will be explored.

CJI 6940 Victimology: Child Abuse and Exploited Children (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the field of victimology and explores its conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature. The course will be delimited by the exploration of the topics: family violence, child abuse including neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional and verbal abuse; and prevention, intervention and treatment issues associated with exploited children.

CJI 6950 Safe Schools: Climate and Culture (3 credits)

This course provides students with an overview of school safety and is intended to prepare students to develop or strengthen strategies, activities, and processes that will enhance the safety and well being of students, staff, and community members. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between stakeholders and the importance of building and sustaining community collaboration for the purpose of school safety. The importance of policies and procedures, legislative mandates, and current safe school standards will be explored.

(Offered through the Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will focus on the rapidly growing global problems of maintaining and securing computer information. Important areas addressed include threats and vulnerabilities, cryptography, authentication and access control, security models, network security, trusted computer systems, distributed systems security, World Wide Web security, applications security, and security management and policies.

*(Please note: the prerequisite course CJI 6750 credits may be used toward electives requirement)

CJI 6101 Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)

An overview of the technical aspects of information security. Issues discussed include authentication, confidentiality, access control, trust and non-repudiation. Investigation of fundamental assurance technologies that can be applied to interface specifications, architectures, and implementations of information security mechanisms. The selection of appropriate security applications, security lifecycles, and interoperability issues will also be covered. Prerequisite: CJI 6750.

CJI 6102 Information Security Management (3 credits)

Provides an understanding to implement effectively the information security vision and strategy set forth by the executive management. The emphasis will be on the management of an information security program. Focus is on the implementation of information security policy, information security planning, development of information security processes, and establishment of information security measures. Concepts and techniques from the management and organizational behavior disciplines will be integrated in order to identify and propose solutions to the problems of information security administration.

CJI 6103 Information Security Governance (3 credits)

Challenges and opportunities of effectively governing an organization's information security requirements and resources. Information security governance lays out the vision for the information security program. Discussions include what constitutes good information security governance, and development of an effective information security strategy and policy. Also focuses on how to improve information security accountability, regulatory compliance, and maturity. Prerequisite: CJI 6102.

CJI 6104 Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)

Fundamental concepts related to an information systems audit. Principles and practices related to secure operation of existing information technology. Information security accountability, development of internal control objectives and framework, and identification of appropriate audit procedures for a secure information system. Prerequisites: CJI 6101 and CJI 6102.

CJI 6105 Information Security Project (3 credits)

This project course integrates all of the knowledge accumulated through the previous courses and serves as a capstone for the Concentration in Information Security. The class focuses on best practices demonstrated through case studies and systems assessment. Students may enroll in this class only after completing all of the information security concentration courses. Prerequisites: CJI 6101, CJI 6102, CJI 6103, and CJI 6104.

CJI 6750 Telecommunications and Computer Networking (3 credits)

This course provides a framework for understanding computer network functionality, characteristics, and configurations. Topics include network topologies, protocols, and architectures and emerging trends in network technologies and services. The role of optical technologies in supporting national and international implementations is explored. Strategies for network planning, implementation, management, and security are introduced. Recent advances in standardization, internetworking, and deployment of LANs (local area networks), MANs (metropolitan area networks), and WANs (wide area networks) are introduced.

(Offered through the Health Professions Division)

Concentration Description:

This concentration will provide specialization training in the burgeoning field of forensic investigation. Students will be exposed to investigative and analysis techniques used during criminal investigations

CJI 6111 Firearms, Fingerprints and Other Impression Evidence (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with a broad overview of the impression evidence discipline in forensic science. Topics discussed will include firearms and tool mark examination and microscopy, footwear and tire concentration examination, and latent fingerprints. Current courtroom challenges such as Daubert issues related to impression evidence will also be discussed. Students will be evaluated on the concepts learned based on practical exercises, tests, final exam, and research paper.

CJI 6112 Forensic Analysis of Trace and Drug Evidence (3 Credits)

This course will be divided into two sections: Trace and Drugs. In the first segment we will cover the different drugs of abuse, the controlled substances act, dependency, and the forensic analysis of these samples. The Trace Evidence segment will include basic microscopy, fibers, paint, glass, fractures, hairs, explosives and arson. Concepts will be solidified via case studies.

CJI 6113 Crime Scene (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with an in depth understanding of the various steps to processing a crime scene such as: scene documentation, evidence collection and preservation, and interpretation. In addition, scene safety and current court room challenges will be discussed.

CJI 6114 DNA Technology that Revolutionized Criminal Investigations (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with a survey of the field of forensic genetics in an understandable manner. Topics will include presumptive testing, a history of serological analyses, the beginning of the era of DNA technology including RFLP and AMPFLP analysis. Newer methods of typing such as Short Tandem Repeat, Y-chromosome STR, SNP analysis, mitochondrial sequencing and finally mini-STRs will be explored. Case studies and examples of these methods will be examined and fully investigated empirically. This course would be an invaluable tool for the criminal investigator and attorneys or those students planning to work in such fields.

CJI 6115 Overview of Crime Laboratory Management (3 Credits)

A review of process management, work flow and future growth will be discussed. This course will provide students with a survey of manpower, quality assurance, safety, and budgeting issues. What job requirements are needed to perform the various jobs from Crime Scene Detective to DNA analyst. Accreditation, certification and outside review of laboratory performance will be explored. The C.S.I. effect and its impact on the modern forensic laboratory will be examined. The competing interests of case analysis, prosecution and investigation will be detailed.

(Offered through the College of Osteopathic Medicine 15 Credits)

CJI 6121 All-Hazards Preparedness (3 credits)

The course will define the interdisciplinary roles and responsibilities of interdisciplinary professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers in all-hazards emergency planning, response, mitigation, and recovery. In view of the constant changes in emergency preparedness this course is designed to provide knowledge, concepts and skills to equip law enforcement professional and other social and health related professions with a background in planning, preventing, protecting against, responding to and recovering from acts of bioterrorism and all-hazards events. Given the role of public health, social service professionals, and law enforcement in emergency preparedness, students will gain insights into effective communication with the health system, the community, and state and local agencies.

(Prerequisite course for CJI 6122, CJI 6123, CJI 6124, and CJI 6125)

CJI 6122 Communicable Diseases and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosive (CBRNE), Challenges (3 credits)

Major challenges in all-hazards preparedness, response, and recovery center around issues and challenges with pandemic influenza and other communicable diseases and effects to humans and the environment due to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events. This course will provide students with an understanding of pandemic influenza, including the risk factors for first responders and the community at large. During a pandemic or a wave of contagious disease, decisions about how to protect the public before an effective vaccine or treatment is available will be reviewed and discussed. Communities, individuals and families, employers, schools, and other organizations will be asked to plan for the use of these interventions to help limit exposure, prevent disease and death, lessen the impact on the economy, and keep societies functioning. The course participants will learn the expectations of preparation and response to a pandemic and to issues related to a CBRNE event or combination of events and the support measures necessary to enforce prevention strategies defined by the community, region, state, nation, and global society. (Prerequisite CJI 6121)

CJI 6123 Interagency Disaster Communication (3 credits)

This course provides the student with information on the Incident Command system (ICS) joined with the state and federal response efforts in the event of a public emergency. Students will identify the core components in the ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). An overview will describe the history, principles and organizational structure of the ICS and enable the responders to operate efficiently during an incident. The material presented will expand upon information covered in the ICS 100 and ICS 700 courses, and include topics such as; communication, pre and post mitigation planning, operational concepts, prioritization of target capabilities, and development of a local Incident Response Plan ( IRP). Students will participate in online tabletop exercises utilizing the ICS. (Prerequisite CJI 6121)

CJI 6124 Community Disaster Preparedness (3 credits)

An all-hazards plan provides a basis for a higher state of readiness. These courses will emphasize disaster resistant communities to build on ongoing Culture of Preparedness. Regardless of whether the incident is non-intentional (as in a natural disaster) or intentional (as in a terrorist threat), law enforcement's role may include enforcing public health orders, securing contaminated areas and health facilities, providing support for transfer of national stockpiles and control of civic unrest. Resources may be overwhelmed and the ability to respond will depend on preparation and partnerships within the community. This course will provide information on development of law enforcement and operational continuity, protection of the officers to contagion and maintaining public order. The importance of law enforcement working in partnership with public health will be emphasized throughout the course. (Prerequisite CJI 6121)

CJI 6125 Special Topics in All-Hazards Preparedness (3 credits)

This course is a capstone research and experience course for the student. Each student will select a topic of interest related to all-hazards preparedness research. In addition, students must take part in an approved community project at the volunteer or professional level in the all-hazards field. (Prerequisite CJI 6121)

Electives (6 Credits)

Students must choose one or a combination of electives below to obtain a total of 6 credit hours.

Important Financial Aid Notice:

Please be advised that financial aid is awarded to students based on a fall/winter/summer academic year. Criminal justice students are required to enroll in at least one core class during each of the fall/winter/summer semesters in order to receive their financial aid as scheduled. Federal regulations permit the posting of financial aid to student's account 7 days prior to his or her earliest scheduled class start date.


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