B.S. in Human Services Administration - Aviation

Curriculum

The bachelor's program in human services administration is comprised of 120 credit hours. The program consists of a general education section, a core course section and the concentration.

Core Courses (3 Credits Each)

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services Administration, including the concentration in Human Factors in Aviation is a 120 credit program. The program consists of 30 credit hours of general education and 54 credit hours within the major.  In addition, students will complete a minimum of 12 credits of electives within the program, and may choose up to 24 credits of open electives of which they may select the 12-credit Basics in Aviation Concentration or 18-credit Professional Development in Aviation Concentration.

Core course requirements include:

This course will review contemporary and historical social issues in the United States, with an emphasis on at-risk populations and disenfranchised groups. Social problems such as gangs, substance abuse, homelessness, child abuse, poverty, and immigration will be addressed, in addition to political, economic, policy, and educational implications.  Systems of delivery within the human services field will be introduced and examined.

This course provides an overview of Human Services Administration as a profession. Emphasis is placed on providing familiarity with the roles and functions of Human Services workers/administrators and an examination of the factors necessary to enter the Human Services field. The course focuses on the history of helping, the human services movement, current issues related to human services, managed care, and models of service delivery. The ethical principles that guide the Human Services Administration profession will also be examined.

This course provides an opportunity to learn basic skills essential for the assessment of interpersonal relations. Students will examine interpersonal dynamics and communication in families, the workplace, community organizations, and social settings. An emphasis is placed on developing skills in listening, observation, and analysis. Case studies will be used to explore a variety of presenting problems and appropriate assessment strategies.

Provides an overview of assessment procedures used in counseling settings including intelligence, achievement, interests, personality, observational assessments, and career.  Students will consider cultural and ethical factors in determining appropriate evaluation instruments, procedure and interpretation of test data.  Application of test data in human services settings will be emphasized.

Provides an overview of management history and theory, schools of management thought, the functions and processes of management, and the environment within which the modern manager operates.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the tools and methodology utilized by economists to analyze how the macro economy functions in both the short and long terms. The course will begin with a study of how market systems and nonmarket systems address the problem of scarcity and unlimited wants. Theories of consumption, investment, the public sector and foreign trade will be developed to illustrate their role in determining the levels of output, employment and prices in both a closed and open economy. The role of Fiscal and Monetary Policies and their short and long run impacts as well as supply side economic theories will be followed by the study of investment in Human and Physical Capital and how these investments influence economic growth and development. The course will conclude with the study of international trade and finance and their impact on the domestic economy. Prerequisite: ECN 2020.

Provides an introduction to financial accounting and its decision-making elements. Areas covered are the conceptual frameworks of accounting, financial statements and their components, and advance manufacturing environments. Prerequisite: MATH 1030 or higher.

Examines the strategies of effective written and oral business communications. Topics include persuasive messages, delivery of good news and bad news, sales letters, collection messages, design of business reports and oral presentations, use of visual aids, and resume preparation. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.

Public Administration is a multi-disciplinary discipline that provides students with the basic skills necessary for employment in government, public service, and non-profit organizations. This course is a survey of the field of public administration, and will introduce the student to the history, theories, concepts, and practice of public administration. This course will provide an overview of the major subfields in public administration and will serve as a basis for further study in the field.

An introductory course in the use of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical descriptive measures, probability, common random variables and their distributions, sampling procedures, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing (including tests for independence and goodness of fit). This course has been exempted from the requirements of the Writing Across the Curriculum policy. Prerequisite: MATH 1030 or higher.

This course provides a basic overview of the legal and ethical issues associated with the human services profession. A case study approach will be applied to provide a variety of realistic situations to illustrate potential ethical challenges and dilemmas. In addition, students will gain familiarity with the ethical standards of the American Counseling Association, the American Psychological Association, and related professional organizations.

This course will examine the role of cultural diversity in human services/helping professions and will allow students the opportunity to increase self-awareness with regard to worldviews and personal beliefs about diversity issues. Key aspects of cultural competency will be reviewed including its history, definitions, and selected conceptual models, in addition to its relevance and importance in the development and administration of human services organizations.

This field experience will be individually arranged and will provide supervised on-site administrative experience (175 hours). Students are expected to propose two non-profit community-based organizations (CBO) and will complete their field experience in one of these. These experiences will provide an in-depth look at nonprofit systems, program development and evaluation, fundraising and issues faced by nonprofit organizations in changing economic and political climates and will be supervised by NSU faculty on a weekly basis.

The purpose of this course is to study the progression of rehabilitating individuals with disabilities in our society today. The relationship that exists among the different agencies and entities in the rehabilitation process will be highlighted and emphasized along with factors that facilitate or hinder the collaborative process. Principles and current practices in the process of rehabilitation will be introduced. These may include: the goals and models of case management in rehabilitation, client/consumer interviewing and assessment, planning for appropriate and effective intervention strategies, services, working with families, and benefits included in a rehabilitation plan, monitoring & evaluation of client progress, and follow up and closure.

Surveys personnel policies, techniques, and methods. Topics include wage and salary management, personnel selection and placement, labor relations, and employee rights.

This course provides an overview of the concept of accountability in Human Services Administration. Students will be introduced to the many ways individuals and agencies are held accountable (i.e., financially, legally, ethically) and the roles stakeholders serve in human services organizations. Special emphasis will be placed on strategies to ensure legal and ethical practices, and to maintain compliance with oversight agencies (i.e., accrediting bodies, grantors, ethical oversight committees, etc.).

This course provides an overview of the competencies necessary to critically plan, implement and evaluate human service programs. Relevant program evaluation models are reviewed and a primer of quantitative and qualitative research methods is provided. Data collection techniques and the ethics and standards of evaluation practice are also covered. Social and human service trends relevant to program planning are also addressed in order to assist in the development of human service programs to meet future societal needs.

The second component of the field experience will be individually arranged as well and will provide supervised on-site administrative experience (175 hours). Students will select their second choice of Community Based Organization (CBO) and will complete their field experience in this site. These experiences will now provide a hands-on implementation of principles and theory learned as it relates to nonprofit systems, program development and evaluation, fundraising, finance and budget issues faced by nonprofit organizations along with factors that impact change in economic and political climates. Students will be supervised by NSU faculty on a weekly basis.

Concentration Course Requirements (Select One)

Basics in Aviation

This course examines the effects of human factors on the aviation industry; namely, how human behaviors affect flight safety, planning, problem solving, resource management, organization, and communication. Students will explore how these variables are impacted by the ability to recognize and manage stress and will have the opportunity to learn anxiety reduction strategies to enhance effective decision-making in the cockpit. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the steps necessary for good judgment and developing decision-making skills to mitigate risk. Students will also gain an understanding of human factors in aviation within the changing landscape of the aviation industry and public policy related to aviation.

This course is designed to ground students in the fundamentals of cockpit management. Specifically, students will be oriented to the principles of aerodynamics, airplane control, and flying rules and regulations. Considerations and steps in aircraft inspection and maintenance, in addition to cockpit orientation and the basic tenets of cockpit management will be covered. Students will be introduced to pre- and post-flight procedures, in addition to aircraft and environmental considerations through take-off, flight, and landing. Emphasis will be placed on human factors impacting cockpit management, including physiological and psychological mechanisms. Basic emergency procedures are also covered.

This course provides students with advanced instruction on factors affecting cockpit/flight management. Topics include managing aircraft systems in a variety of environments, flight planning, communications, navigation, laws and rules related to private aviation, and orientation to in-flight environmental considerations unique to flight.

In this course, students will gain Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) training. This training will enable students to develop proficiencies in using the aircraft's instruments and navigational equipment. Organization and planning are emphasized to effectively combine the information from charts, plates, radios and ATC. Furthermore, this course will provide students with an understanding of instrument management through take-off, flight, and landing while simultaneously exploring the human factors that affect each phase of flight. Examines in detail how human factors such as stress, emotion, attention management, health/physiology, and human psychology impact cockpit management. Advanced strategies for monitoring and modulating human factors are also discussed. Case examples will be utilized to further students' understanding of how mistakes could have been avoided or have been avoided in the aviation industry.

Professional Development in Aviation

This course examines the effects of human factors on the aviation industry; namely, how human behaviors affect flight safety, planning, problem solving, resource management, organization, and communication. Students will explore how these variables are impacted by the ability to recognize and manage stress and will have the opportunity to learn anxiety reduction strategies to enhance effective decision-making in the cockpit. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the steps necessary for good judgment and developing decision-making skills to mitigate risk. Students will also gain an understanding of human factors in aviation within the changing landscape of the aviation industry and public policy related to aviation.

This course is designed to ground students in the fundamentals of cockpit management. Specifically, students will be oriented to the principles of aerodynamics, airplane control, and flying rules and regulations. Considerations and steps in aircraft inspection and maintenance, in addition to cockpit orientation and the basic tenets of cockpit management will be covered. Students will be introduced to pre- and post-flight procedures, in addition to aircraft and environmental considerations through take-off, flight, and landing. Emphasis will be placed on human factors impacting cockpit management, including physiological and psychological mechanisms. Basic emergency procedures are also covered.

This course provides students with advanced instruction on factors affecting cockpit/flight management. Topics include managing aircraft systems in a variety of environments, flight planning, communications, navigation, laws and rules related to private aviation, and orientation to in-flight environmental considerations unique to flight.

In this course, students will gain Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) training. This training will enable students to develop proficiencies in using the aircraft's instruments and navigational equipment. Organization and planning are emphasized to effectively combine the information from charts, plates, radios and ATC. Furthermore, this course will provide students with an understanding of instrument management through take-off, flight, and landing while simultaneously exploring the human factors that affect each phase of flight. Examines in detail how human factors such as stress, emotion, attention management, health/physiology, and human psychology impact cockpit management. Advanced strategies for monitoring and modulating human factors are also discussed. Case examples will be utilized to further students' understanding of how mistakes could have been avoided or have been avoided in the aviation industry.

The Commercial License course examines in greater depth and breadth flight management by analyzing issues and topics unique to commercial aviation. This course is designed to develop the student's advanced aeronautical knowledge and skill in the operation of complex airplanes to a level commensurate with safe operations as a commercial pilot. Topics include management of commercial aircraft systems in a variety of environments, commercial flight planning, laws and rules governing commercial aviation, and the development of skills needed to communicate and navigate commercial flights.

The Certified Flight Instructor course provides students with the fundamentals of flight instruction. Specifically, the objective of this flight training course is to develop in each student adequate instructional knowledge and skill in the procedures and pilot operations needed to safely exercise the privileges of a certified flight instructor certificate with an airplane - single-engine rating. The course examines flight management, while simultaneously educating students in the skills necessary to teach others how to fly. Topics include human learning, memory, and motivation; teaching and supervisory methods; overcoming barriers to effective communication; professionalism; and lesson planning.



Connect with NSU on:

  • facebook
  • YouTube
  • MySpace.com
  • Twitter
  • Flickr
  • LinkedIn
  • Foursquare