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DONOR CONNECTION

Fireworks-Worthy

July commenced with a rush of patriotism, and so does this issue of Donor Connection. Cyber security is critical to preserving our American ideals and way of life, and Yair Levy, Ph.D. – the focus of our Dream Profile -- is one among many at NSU leading the charge for our nation.

As we look forward to mid-summer respites, many NSU students are at the height of tremendous learning experiences that NSU paves the way for through our travel study program and internships placed across the globe. I invite you to view a TEDxNSU video of one student recounting a pivotal moment that came as a result of working at a transplant ward in Graz, Austria.

Before you reach Natalie Negron’s story, you’ll meet a legal eagle whose rocketing career would not have launched save the groundbreaking AAMPLE® (Alternative Admissions Model Program for Legal Education), developed right here at NSU’s Shepard Broad Law Center. By providing universities with an alternative way to identify promising talents who are “diamonds in the rough,” AAMPLE® helps uncover exceptional talent that may only lack the final touches needed to outshine the competition. NSU’s core values of innovation and opportunity are brilliantly displayed in Carrie L. Sarver’s story and success.

Finally, before summer ends, we will celebrate the official opening of our Puerto Rico campus in San Juan.

Please enjoy these stories and more. You, our donors, help make them all possible.

Sincerely,

Jennifer

Jennifer O’Flannery Anderson, Ph.D.,
Vice President for Advancement and Community Relations
joa@nova.edu


Faculty Profile | Yair Levy, Ph.D.

Professor of Information Systems
Director of the Center for eLearning Security Research
Fellow & Distinguished Scholar, International Institute for Applied Knowledge Management

Federal officials have called South Florida the “World Capital” of cyber-crime, yet investment directed toward prevention research has been minimal, according to Yair Levy, Ph.D. at NSU's Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences (GSCIS). 

Yair Levy, Ph.D.

Professor of Information Systems
Director of the Center for eLearning Security Research
Fellow & Distinguished Scholar, International Institute for Applied Knowledge Management

Federal officials have called South Florida the “World Capital” of cyber-crime, yet investment directed toward prevention research has been minimal, according to Yair Levy, Ph.D. at NSU's Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences (GSCIS). 

Driven by a sense of patriotism, Levy helps the intelligence community address cyber security threats. He has advised the U.S. Secret Service, helped sailors on five U.S. Navy aircraft carriers transition from old to new combat information systems, and improved measureable security skills of more than 300 New York Transit Authority officers, to name just three accomplishments.

Current projects with the NSU team seek to secure systems, authenticate users, and develop national indices comparing the security of elearning systems. If allowed to dream, however, he would cultivate cyber intelligence among high school students, and make NSU a leader in cybersecurity research and mobile cyber-computing forensics:

With $1 million, we could establish a program to educate young Americans, starting with high school students in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, about cyber-security breaches. The Cyber-Security Training and Research (CyberSTAR) program would consist of an ambassador program and research to measure students’ cyber-security skills.

With $5 million, we could establish a cybersecurity research center and laboratory (CyLab). CyLab’s mission would be to help prevent the type of security breaches that are constantly being reported in the media. Tremendous potential exists to position the center as one of the top laboratories in the nation and achieve external recognition from the National Security Agencies.

With $10 million, we could combine these two ideas and expand the CyLab to address security breaches in mobile computing and include a whole unit that can lead the nation in mobile cybercomputing forensics.

If you would like to learn more, email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.

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Alumna Profile | Carrie L. Sarver

Juris Doctor, NSU’s Shepard Broad Law Center
Deputy Counsel, Toho Water Authority
Former Assistant City Attorney III,
City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Board Certified in Local Government Law
AAMPLE® (Alternative Admissions Model Program in Legal Education) Participant

Three generations of Sarver women traveled to Washington D.C. for a momentous event. The youngest, only 32 years of age at the time and the first in her family to graduate college let alone law school, raised her right hand and was sworn into the U.S. Supreme Court Bar. But for NSU’s AAMPLE® program, Carrie L. Sarver says a moment she will never forget, would likely never have happened.

Carrie L. Sarver

Juris Doctor, NSU’s Shepard Broad Law Center
Deputy Counsel, Toho Water Authority
Former Assistant City Attorney III,
City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Board Certified in Local Government Law
AAMPLE® (Alternative Admissions Model Program in Legal Education) Participant

AAMPLE® SUCCESS

Three generations of Sarver women traveled to Washington D.C. for a momentous event. The youngest, only 32 years of age at the time and the first in her family to graduate college let alone law school, raised her right hand and was sworn into the U.S. Supreme Court Bar. But for NSU’s AAMPLE® program, Carrie L. Sarver says a moment she will never forget, would likely never have happened.

As a prospective law school candidate, Sarver had everything going for her – she graduated college with honors and an impressive list of leadership roles. She performed outstandingly well… on everything except standardized tests. Sarver wanted to attend NSU because she saw a lot of judges and attorneys coming out of the Center, and she thought the partnerships initiated with the community set NSU apart from other universities. Luckily, the AAMPLE® program provided an opportunity to prove herself worthy of admittance.

Developed by Joseph Harbaugh, LL.M., professor of law and dean emeritus of NSU’s Shepard Broad Law Center, AAMPLE® stands for Alternative Admissions Model Program in Legal Education. Patented just this year, the program serves as an additional method of identifying candidates for law school admission. The talent payoff attributed to AAMPLE® includes students who have been editors in chief and executive editors of the Nova Law Review; editors in chief and articles editors of the ILSA Journal of International and Comparative Law; and winners of the upper class moot court competitions. Sarver is another talent payoff example.

“It’s ironic that I went from barely being able to get in based upon my LSAT score to ranking in the Top 10 of my class after the first semester,” Sarver said. “Since I was yay high, being a lawyer is all I’ve ever known I wanted to be, so I am just really grateful for that program.”

After graduating NSU Shepard Broad Law Center, Sarver served as an Assistant City Attorney for the City of Fort Lauderdale for eight years. She was sworn in to the U.S. Supreme Court Bar in 2010 in case she needed to argue an appeal from the City Commission of the City of Fort Lauderdale. (The reply brief she wrote and won on appeal in Circuit Court was appealed by the petitioner all the way up to the United States Supreme Court, but the Supreme Court denied the petitioner’s appeal for oral argument.) In February, she became Deputy General Counsel for the Tohopekaliga (Toho) Water Authority in Kissimmee, Florida -- the largest provider of water, wastewater and reclaimed water services in Osceola County. In June, Sarver was appointed to the Board of Directors for the Osceola County Bar Association and became a Board Certified Attorney in Local Government Law, a designation with strict prerequisites and an extensive peer review and exam process. She also became a NSU donor.

Sarver said her gift to NSU may be used for scholarships or additional resources as the university deems fit. “I really appreciate the opportunity I was given, and I think that it’s important to give back because the university is only as strong as its alumni,” Sarver said.  

 If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.
 

Student Profile | Natalie Negron

Biology Major, NSU’s Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
(Minors: History and Behavior neuroscience)

Stolzenberg-Doan Scholarship Recipient
Science Alive! Volunteer Elementary School Teacher
First-Time-In-College Mentor
Pre-Medical Society Member

Natalie Negron

Natalie Negron

Biology Major, NSU’s Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
(Minors: History and Behavior neuroscience)

Stolzenberg-Doan Scholarship Recipient
Science Alive! Volunteer Elementary School Teacher
First-Time-In-College Mentor
Pre-Medical Society Member

ENTERING THE GRAY AREA

As a 20-year-old biology major on a summer externship in Austria, Natalie Negron watched doctors remove organs from a young woman and realized that her patient would not only impact the lives of needy transplant recipients across Europe, but hers as well. Her new TEDxNSU video recounts her experience, and the burning question that formed as she stood at the head of that operating table.

Negron was one of two NSU undergraduate biology students invited to observe and assist surgeons overseas over a six week period in Graz, Austria. While working in the transplant ward at the Medical University of Graz, Negron administered medication and IVs to patients, drew blood, and assisted surgeons with suturing. She and her colleague also assisted with such procedures as kidney and liver transplants, ACL reconstruction, and the removal of a patient’s cancerous gallbladder.

Negron describes the entire experience as life changing with one moment that stands out above the rest – the day she was called to a transplant surgery in a nearby town. A woman in her late 20s had been declared brain dead, and according to Austrian law, Negron explains, her organs were to be donated to those in need.

“Her heart was for Germany, her liver for Belgium, and her kidneys for Austria,” Negron said.

Unlike the other surgeries she presided over, Negron realized that the constant song of the heart rate monitor would soon fall silent. In the meantime, the woman on the table wasn’t quite dead or alive; she was in “a gray area.” Putting herself in that position, Negron asked herself: ‘If I were to die tomorrow, would I be happy with the life that I’ve led?’ At age 20, this is not a question a person often asks. But now she does.

Now she lives her life so that when she does enter that “gray area” she can look back on her life and say ‘I am happy with the life I’ve led and that my life will be remembered for the good that I brought into this world.’ Hear the entire story in her words by watching Negron’s TEDxNSU video.

If you would like to learn more about leadership gifts to support scholarships, travel study and internship programs, please email Robin Blackwell, or call her at (954) 262-2109.

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GIVING NEWS

Children whose poor reading performance may be due to a common vision disorder will have an opportunity this fall to enroll in a new study thanks to a National Eye Institute grant of up to $556,532 to NSU’s College of Optometry. The grant will fund the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial—Attention and Reading Trial (CITT-ART), a national multi-center clinical trial that involves optometry, ophthalmology, psychiatry and education in determining how the eye-teaming problem impacts a child’s attention and reading performance.  (Convergence insufficiency results in the eyes turning slightly outward when a person is reading or doing work close to his or her eyes, preventing the eyes from working as a “team”.)

“Children who have convergence insufficiency sometimes suffer from poor reading performance and attention problems,” said Rachel A. “Stacey” Coulter, O.D., M.S.Ed., principal investigator for NSU College of Optometry’s research team. “As the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to study this problem, outcomes of this study could lead to new therapies for some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and reading problems. We are very excited that the National Eye Institute has funded our grant application, and we look forward to enrolling children into the study this fall.”

The NSU College of Optometry faculty research team consists of Rachel A. “Stacey” Coulter, O.D., M.S.Ed. (Principal Investigator); Annette Bade, O.D., M.S.; Pamela Oliver, O.D., M.S.; Gregory Fecho, O.D.; Erin Jenewein, O.D., M.S.; Deborah Amster, O.D.; Yin C. Tea, O.D.; Jacqueline Rodena, O.D.; and Nicole Patterson, O.D., M.S.Ed.

NSU is one of seven clinical sites participating across the United States. Other sites include Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio; Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami; Marshall B. Ketchum University in Fullerton, Calif.; Ohio State University, Salus University in Elkins Park, Pa.; The State University of New York; and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Denise Rau, or call her at (954) 262-2163.

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Mario Hernandez

Watch Video Here

Alumna Elizabeth Ricci, J.D. played a central role in the ground swelling of support for Vietnam veteran Mario Hernandez, who suddenly found himself facing federal fraud charges when his citizenship was called into question.

Mario Hernandez arrived in the United States as nine-year-old refugee from Cuba. He was issued a social security number and what he only recently discovered had been temporary paperwork. He never knew his parents did not file the final paperwork to make him a permanent citizen.

In the meantime, Hernandez served the U.S. army in the Vietnam War and worked for the federal government for 22 years. Ironically, the trigger for questioning his citizenship was a passport request so that he could treat his wife to a celebration cruise following his retirement from the Federal Bureau of Prisons – an agency that requires citizenship and ongoing background checks.

Instead of a well-earned vacation, Hernandez became the target of an investigation that at one point went so far as to threaten possible charges of voter fraud. Minimally he faced prison and fines for falsely claiming citizenship.

"I thought I was a citizen - I’ve always been proud of being a citizen,' Hernandez told The New York Times. 'This has really messed with my head."

Hernandez hired Ricci to plead his case. She succeeded. And finally, in late May, immigration authorities apologized and quickly administered for Hernandez the Oath of Allegiance so the 58-year-old veteran could officially be recognized as a U.S. citizen.

The case was far from easy, however, despite Hernandez’s clean record and years of military and government service. In one article, Ricci noted that it was not until she took the story to the media that she began to receive positive indications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

Hernandez thanked Ricci with a gift to NSU being used to establish a new scholarship for Shepard Broad Law Center students who serve in the Veteran’s Law Clinic.

 If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.

Concerning Belonging

Watch Video Here

Two NSU centers are casting a bright light on homelessness. One promotes an innovative curriculum to address the health care and psychosocial needs of individuals experiencing homelessness. The other is fostering empathy for and empowerment of local shelter residents through a powerful, summer-long art initiative titled Research and Development: Concerning Belonging.

Project HOPE

Championed by NSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM), one goal of Project HOPE (Homeless in Osteopathic Pre-doctoral Education) is to improve student and professional perceptions and attitudes by providing homeless-specific core lectures (facilitated in part by unsheltered individuals), service-learning opportunities, and clinical field rotations in facilities serving individuals experiencing homelessness.

All COM students are required to track the self-reported housing status of all patients with whom they interact in every clinical rotation setting during their clinical years. Despite pervasive perceptions, homelessness comprises more people than those residing primarily on the streets or in shelters. As NSU students learn, a homeless individual is any individual who lacks housing, including individuals or families doubled up with or living with friends or relatives in a transient manner. 

Relating housing status to health status is further necessary to provide good medical counsel. One example described by NSU’s Elliot Sklar, Ph.D., M.S., assistant professor of public health, family medicine and disaster and emergency preparedness and Project HOPE director, is sensitivity to the fact that a patient who needs to elevate and ice an injured/swollen knee might not be able to easily follow such a recommendation.

Most recently, Project HOPE developed a partnership with the TaskForce for Ending Homelessness, Inc. in Broward County. The latter provides outreach services to the homeless via two mobile units that venture out into the local community two times each day, 365 days a year. In addition to COM doctoral students, students in NSU’s Physician Assistant, Nursing, Occupational Therapy and Master of Public Health programs are now benefiting from the experience of volunteering in the mobile outreach vans serving individuals experiencing homelessness right in our collective backyard.  

“I find tremendous value and meaning in this work and in the initiative I see within our students to help those most in need,” Sklar said. “So often, these individuals are invisible in our society and by simply addressing their voice, we can make change rather than giving change.”

Homeless, Not Voiceless

One of the five contemporary artists participating in an initiative by NSU’s Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale (MOA) is literally giving voices to the homeless. Miami performance artist Antonia Wright is in the midst of recording “Sound Portraits” designed to empower homeless shelter residents.

“Each sound portrait you’ll end up listening to is created by a person you already have a certain set of beliefs about, just because of what society says about marginalized groups of people,” Wright recently explained to a Sun-Sentinel reporter.

The artists are mid-way through projects for “Research and Development: Concerning Belonging” which will culminate at the end of summer in public exhibitions at MOA. In the meantime, the artists have taken up residency at the museum, providing artists with essential time and space to further their work and apply creativity to social issues.  The artists are further able tap NSU faculty to advance their research. MOA staff also secured a $20,000 Funding Arts Broward grant and partnered with a Fort Lauderdale-based homeless shelter, where three of the five invited participants will conduct art workshops for residents. Through the sound art, sculpture and digital media workshops, artists hope to help others understand some of the ways that art can create a “sense of belonging.”

“It makes sense to address homelessness in Broward, and rethink the whole idea of how the issue is handled,” said MOA executive director Bonnie Clearwater. “Artists express themselves creatively better than most, and they deal with issues of belonging or not belonging on a daily basis.”

Hear from all five artists in the included video clip, and consider joining us at the next open studio night on August 14.  The exhibition will run through September 14 and feature in its last month works made by individuals at the shelter, along with a documentary of the workshops and personal stories of shelter participant.

This exhibition is supported in part by the Art of Community Initiative of the Community Foundation of Broward and made possible in part through the support of FAB! Knight New Work Award supported by Funding Arts Broward and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

 In you would like to learn more about Project Hope or other opportunities to support NSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, please email Ashley Sharp, or call her at (954) 262-2150.

 If you are interested in supporting MOA’s innovative programming, or considering donations of art, please email Terry Mularkey or call him at (954) 262-2064. 

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As part of their ongoing support of NSU, the SunTrust Foundation donated $50,000 to fund an endowed scholarship in honor of the university’s 50th anniversary celebration. The scholarships will help Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences undergraduate students with financial need who are first the in their family to attend college.

“We are proud to support Nova Southeastern University through this scholarship and our other charitable contributions,” said Margaret Callihan, chairman, president and CEO, SunTrust Bank South Florida. “Helping students in their pursuit of higher education and preparation for a professional career is not only a worthy cause but a good business decision that will drive our economic sustainability.”

Both SunTrust and SunTrust Foundation are Silver Members of the Fellows Society, NSU’s highest level of philanthropic benefactors.

 To learn more about leadership giving options, please email Robin Blackwell, or call her at (954) 262-2135.

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Crowdfunding Video

Watch Campaign Video

Coral Reef Coverage

Watch News Video

Crowdfunding involves funding a project or venture by raising money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet.

NSU recently took to crowdfunding platform Indiegogo in the hopes of raising $10,000 to help save the threatened Staghorn coral from extinction.  The first-time effort resulted in students reaching 35% of their goal in less than 30 days! 

NSU aims to grow enough corals in our nursery to outplant thousands of coral fragments per year back to South Florida reefs so that they may continue to grow, spawn, and help in replenishing the existing Staghorn population.

As Channel 10 News reported, the complex fragment web grows for a year or two in NSU’s underwater nursery until they are big enough to be transferred to a real reef. Watch the video for the full story, including interviews with several NSU students.

 If you would like to support NSU’s Coral Reef Initiative, please give via the crowdfunding page by August 6, 2014, or contact Wendy Wood by email or by calling 954-262-3617.

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Just 50 years ago, champions of NSU’s mission resolved to make the dream a reality. Founders contributed family land, hosted Race Days at Gulfstream Park, and even inspired one man to handwrite a $1 million pledge on the back of an envelope. Why? To provide the “missing link” in South Florida’s development: a postgraduate research institution concentrating on science and technology.

Today, NSU honors that vision by succeeding as a doctoral research university whose advances in science and technology will soar to new heights thanks to the Center for Collaborative Research currently under construction. The high tech and biotech initiatives that will be housed there together with the complementary facilities that will eventually comprise Dr. Hanbury’s vision for an Academical Village will help create new classes of research scholars, bridging the theoretical and clinical.

Each fiscal year, NSU taps champions to advance the university’s mission. At our fiscal year end for 2014 (June 30), NSU was able to count outright gifts, pledges and bequests amounting to $19.3 million.

Thank you for all that you do to help facilitate student opportunities and advance NSU’s mission and Vision 2020!

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Floridian Bank recently made a contribution in honor of NSU’s Concussion Management Clinic, one of the largest community-based sport concussion initiatives in Florida. NSU provides state-of-the-art concussion management services to the 32 public and private high schools in the Broward County Athletic Association.

 If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Denise Rau, or call her at (954) 262-2163.

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UNIVERSITY NEWS  

The tsunami that devastated Fukushima, Japan, motivated a high school junior at NSU’s University School to design a drone to help first responders. Over the course of a year, Ethan Gellman worked side-by-side with mentor Eric Ackerman, Ph.D., Dean of NSU’s Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences (GSCIS) who previously conducted research for the U.S. space program, which implemented several of his designs and devices.

Gellman saw the potential for drones to revolutionize rescue efforts and sought collaboration through University School’s Science Research Mentorship Program. The program allows students to participate in cutting-edge research and work alongside field and research professionals.

Together, Gellman and Ackerman created “The Rescue Drone,” a flying device constructed primarily of aluminum and carbon fiber blades that boasts a 4-foot wing span and the capability to fly autonomously. The one-foot tall device is equipped with a GPS system and infrared camera so that a human can be detected in an area of devastation by body temperature. The Rescue Drone would then relay the individual’s coordinates to rescue workers.

Gellman hopes the drone can save lives of disaster victims and disaster rescue teams alike. “It will help locate victims quickly, as many drones can go into the area simultaneously, and keep first responders safe as they will only have to go into a potentially dangerous area if someone is located by the drone,” Gellman explained.

Both Ackerman and Gellman credit University School’s mentorship program for creating research opportunities that challenge students and inspire them to extend their education beyond the classroom.

“Back in the ‘80s, I was one of the students who wanted more, and unfortunately nothing existed. Now, students like Ethan have the ability to work on projects that potentially help them get into top engineering schools,” Ackerman said.

“My parents have always supported my ideas. I was lucky to find a school that did, too,” Gellman added.

Gellman is currently fine-tuning his prototype for submission to international science fairs in the coming school year. 

 For more information about NSU’s University School and the initiatives in need of support, please email Wynne Avellanet, or call her at (954) 262-4524.

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Puerto Rico CampusOver the last several years, NSU has observed a steady increase in the number of students enrolled in the programs offered in Puerto Rico.  Establishing a campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico allows the university to support the scholarly pursuits of NSU students and faculty in Puerto Rico, and to advance its commitment to academic excellence, scholarship, research, innovation, and community engagement. 

If you would like to learn more about leadership gifts that can support academic programs, campuses, travel study and internship programs, please email Robin Blackwell, or call her at (954) 262-2019.

Campus Web Page

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24 Alumni Sworn Into Supreme Court BarNSU Alumni appeared before all nine justices of the United States Supreme Court to be sworn in to the bar of the highest court of the nation. Over a course of three days NSU’s Law Center professor Bruce Rogow, J.D. and visiting professor Tim O’Brien, J.D. presented motions to admit a total of 24 NSU alumni. Chief Justice John Roberts granted the motions, which following their recitation of the oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution, made the alumni eligible to argue cases before the Supreme Court.

To qualify, an applicant must be admitted to practice in the highest court of a state, commonwealth, territory, possession or the District of Columbia for at least three years prior to the date of application. NSU’s admitted alumni comprised members of the Bars for Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia who also pursuant to requirements had not been the subject of any adverse disciplinary during that time, but rather appeared to the Court to be of good moral and professional character.

On hand to witness the first day of alumni inductions were NSU President George L. Hanbury, II, Ph.D; NSU Vice President for Advancement and Community Relations, Jennifer O'Flannery Anderson, Ph.D; NSU Executive Director of Alumni Relations, Sharon Sullivan; NSU Law Center Interim Dean Elena B. Langan, J.D; and NSU Director Alumni Relations Elena Minicucci, J.D.

Those admitted to practice before the nation’s highest court included:
Mark Solomon '79
Melina Buncome '93
Dennis Moore '93
Thomasina Moore '93
Prince Donnahoe '95
Luis Gomez '96
Joshua Goodman '98
Samantha Fitzgerald '99 
William O’ Connor '00
Molly Gaussa '02
Bartosz Ostrzenski '02
Clarissa Cabreja '03
Jose Guerrero '03
Victoria Morton '03
Scott Smiley '03
Karey L. Bosack Greenstein '05
Ignacio Sarmiento '05
Jason Chodos '06                                                    
Natalie Giachos '06
Kara Schickowski '07
Ethan Wall '07                          
Keith Sonderling '08
Trisha Hewes '09
Chad Van Horn '09
                               

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss giving opportunities to support NSU's Shepard Broad Law Center, please email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.

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John Garon HeadshotJohn Garon, J.D. has taken the helm of NSU’s Shepard Broad Law Center, the only law school in Broward County, which further tied with two schools at the No. 3 spot nationally for diversity, according to U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Graduate Schools for Law,” and No. 1 for diversity in Florida, according to the Law School Diversity Index.

Garon points to diversity as a strength and core value that together with the Law Center’s commitment to professional readiness and its extensive international engagement provide sources of pride enabling NSU students to thrive in a changing environment.

“Our graduates must learn the critical thinking essential to undertake their role as legal professionals, just as they have for generations,” Garon said. “In addition, however, they must also prepare themselves with knowledge of a global economy and a complex technological environment requiring skills never imagined a generation ago.”

Garon notes that NSU’s online Masters of Science in Law programs and the nationally-recognized -- and recently patented – computer-based AAMPLE® (Alternative Admissions Model Program in Legal Education) program offer proof positive that NSU continues to advance innovative approaches to online education. As a noted authority on legal education, he should know.  

In addition to serving as past chair of the American Bar Association’s Law School Administration Committee and American Association of Law Schools Section on Part-Time Legal Education, Garon’s scholarship extends broadly over the areas of emerging technologies, and their impact on business, society, the practice of law and delivery of legal education, as well as the field of entertainment law.

In his previous role as dean for Hamline Law School in St. Paul, Minn., Garon created and advanced law school programs to national ranking and secured approval for two joint degree programs. At Northern Kentucky University, he grew the Chase Law + Informatics Institute to national acclaim as one of the top 13 law school’s nationwide teaching law practice technology and securing the school’s first $1 million donation to name the W. Bruce Lunsford Academy for Law, Business and Technology.

“The Shepard Broad Law Center remains focused on educating professionals committed to their profession, their community, and their clients,” Garon said. “Much is changing in legal education and the practice of law, but this commitment is not among them. With your continued support, I am confident the Law Center will continue its tradition of excellence and innovation.”

Garon received his Bachelors of Arts in Psychology and Theater from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and his Juris Doctor from Columbia Law School in New York where he was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar.

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.

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Bullying Report Video

Watch Video Here

As summer heats up all around us, NSU’s experts are not slowing down as they continue to be a go-to source for a variety of hot topics. During the month of June and early July, NSU stories were circulated to more than 2.1 billion viewers across the globe and stories were placed in the media with an estimated advertising value equivalency of $19.6 million.

Dean Eric Ackerman, Ph.D., and Yair Levy, Ph.D., from NSU’s Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences (GSIS), were interviewed for national articles on hacking and credit card fraud, respectively.  NSU Associate Provost and program professor Meline Kevorkian, Ph.D. was interviewed regarding the nation-wide issue of bullying and how she is teaching educators to best deal will bullies. The university also had the opportunity to focus on our research core value through an annual research advertorial highlighting the Center for Collaborative Research and several collaborative projects in Florida Trend. This month’s issue of the magazine, which reaches business leaders throughout the state, also highlights Ana Castejon, Ph.D.  And, continuing a focus on NSU’s regional campuses, placements were secured focusing on the Cardiac Sonography program in Tampa and the Respiratory Therapy program in Palm Beach.

University Relations and Public Affairs (954) 262-5353.

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Each year, South Florida Business Journal takes stock of major players in law and accounting, and recognizes individuals who made notable contributions in their respective specialty areas. The list of 2014 Power Leaders in Law and Accounting includes three NSU Alumni.

Alumni Power Leaders:

Michael J. Fichtel, J.D. ‘87

Principal Partner/CEO
Kelley Konenberg, Attorneys at Law

Fichtel joined Kelly Kronenberg upon admission to the Florida Bar in 1987. In his new position, he is implementing a vision for expanding and diversifying the firm internationally as well as nationally.

Fichtel exemplifies the firm’s philosophy of global responsibility by supporting numerous philanthropic organizations and endeavors including: Broward Education Foundation, United Way, Women in Distress, Special Olympics, Dan Marino Foundation, Fraternal Order of Police, The Victory Center for Autism and related disabilities Huntington’s Disease Society of America, The Women’s’ Breast Health Initiative, Wounded Warrior Project Diabetes Research Institute, United Jewish Appeal Vietnamese Association of Jacksonville, Our Lady of the Lakes Church, Randy Rankin Scholarship, Classic Florida Tour De Force, Navarro Discount Pharmacy’s Food Campaign, Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, and 19th Ward Youth Foundation. 

Scott D. Krevans, J.D. ‘86

Partner
Conroy, Simberg, Ganon, Krevans, Abel, Lurvey, Morrow & Schefer

Krevans is a trial lawyer who practices in all areas of defense litigation, including bad faith, premises and products liability, environmental law, automobile liability, legal malpractice, agent errors and omissions, architects, engineers and accounting matters, public municipality liability, as well as coverage disputes, and the defense of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. He is a member of the Florida Bar and is admitted to practice before the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. In addition, he is a member of the American Bar Association, the Florida Defense Lawyers Association, and the Defense Research Institute.

Since his admission to the Bar, Scott has litigated cases throughout Florida. Scott has also lectured extensively on bad faith and extra-contractual liability, is AV® rated, and was chosen as one of South Florida's Top Rated Lawyers for 2012.

Howard Wander, J.D. ‘87

Principal Partner/COO
Kelly Kronenberg, Attorneys at Law

Wander serves as both a Principal Partner and the Chief Operating Officer for the firm. He is also the Managing Partner of the West Palm Beach office, concentrating his practice on Insurance Defense Litigation and Property and Casualty defense. He is rated AV Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell, which indicates a demonstration of the highest professional and ethical standards and is the highest rating a lawyer can receive. Other awards include recognition as a 2014 Top Lawyer by South Florida Legal Guide, a “Leading Lawyer” in the South Florida Business Journal’s 2012 Book of Law, and a “2010 Legal Impact Leader” in South Florida Business Leader Magazine.
Wander is certified by the State of Florida to provide continuing education courses and conducts seminars for clients on a variety of insurance defense matters. He also supports Habitat for Humanity.

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Each year, South Florida Business Journal recognizes the most dynamic individuals under the age of 40, who work diligently to contribute to their company’s growth and to improve the local community. Five honorees this year are NSU graduates.

Top 40 Under 40:

Cronin HeadshotTimothy (Tim) Cronin, J.D. ‘06

Vice President, SunTrust Bank

Timothy Cronin has been with SunTrust Bank since October 2011. Prior to becoming vice president he served as commercial banking relationship manager. His previous employments include middle market lender and credit portfolio manager at Fifth Third Bank, and business banker at Wachovia bank. 

He serves as board member and volunteer of Broward Partnership, board member and Class 31 graduate of Leadership Broward Foundation, and Ghost Light Society and host committee member of Broward Center for the Performing Arts.

Piira HeadshotJonna M. Piira, M.B.A. ‘08

Chief Financial OfficerIron Bridge Tools and Better for You Foods, LLC

Piira serves as chief financial officer of Iron Bridge Tools, a company which manufactures tools such as pliers, wrenches and flashlights for such customers as Home Depot. She also serves as chief financial officer of Better For You Foods LLC, a company headquartered in Delray Beach, Florida that makes all natural Better4U! foods products, including healthy frozen pizzas.

Piira recently co-chaired this year's "Fort Lauderdale's Finest Gala" Cystic Fibrosis Foundation fundraiser and was honored by the organization as one of Fort Lauderdale’s young professionals for her success in business, leadership and fundraising commitment to the organization. She also is a member of BROWARD PULSE, an arm of the American Health Association. 

Scherer HeadshotJohn J. Scherer, J.D. ‘04

Partner, Conrad Scherer
President & Owner, Gulf Building Corp.

John J. Scherer’s government relations practice focuses on providing clients throughout South Florida with strategic counsel on procurement and government contract issues. In addition to his role at Conrad & Scherer, Scherer is the president and owner of Gulf Building and Gulf Design Group. As a certified general contractor with significant experience in construction, Scherer is able to serve the Firm’s clients either as special counsel or as an expert witness on large complex commercial and residential construction cases.

Scherer is a member of the Florida Bar Association, Florida Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors. He currently serves on the boards of the Broward County Enterprise Zone Board, City of Fort Lauderdale Economic Advisory, Greater Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce Downtown Council, Florida Building Commission (Governor Crist Appointee), and the Construction Association of South Florida.

Alison F. Smith, J.D. ‘03

Partner, Weiss Serota Helfman Pastoria Cole & Boniske, PL

Alison F. Smith’s primary areas of practice include: labor and employment, commercial litigation, appellate law, and administrative and regulatory law. She also provides labor advice to several municipalities such as the Town of Golden Beach, City of Miramar, City of Lauderhill and the City of Homestead, and has drafted numerous policies and employee handbooks for municipalities throughout Miami-Dade and Broward counties. 

Smith serves on the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Fair Employment Practices Agency Liaison Committee, Stephen R. Booher American Inns of Court, board of directors of Legal Aid Services of Broward County, Coast to Coast Legal Aide of South Florida and is a member of the Florida Association of Women Lawyers, Miami Dade Chapter. She is the president of the Caribbean Bar Association. 

Smith graduated magna cum laude from Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Law School in 2003 and was the valedictorian, President of the Student Bar Association and a member of the NSU Law Review. The mentor and the best advice received: Thomas Panza of Panza, Maurer & Maynard, P.A. said the most important thing to remember is that success is relative and happiness is paramount and the pinnacle of success.

Kirk D. Weiss, J.D. ‘07

General Counsel, Areas USA
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Kirk Weiss serves as general counsel for Areas USA, Inc. and its 13 wholly-owned subsidiaries. He represents Areas USA in a wide array of complex corporate matters, including M&A, real estate, intellectual property, construction, contract, franchising, insurance, labor, and employment and tax issues. He has served as lead counsel on behalf of Areas USA in front of Tax Boards and City Councils in several jurisdictions. Weiss manages the legal department, union collective bargaining and outside litigation, and also serves as a member of the Executive Committee, playing a pivotal role in strategic and nationwide operating decisions.

Weiss is a local board member of the American Diabetes Association, served as the finance chair for the inaugural Stone Crab 160, a non-profit organization that organizes a fund raising bike ride that spans 160 miles and benefits all foster care programs in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and is an avid supporter of the Minority Corporate Counsel Association. He also is an active member of the Florida Bar.

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STEM Program StudentsStudents from South Broward High School’s Marine Magnet Program toured NSU’s land-based coral nursery, participated in lab activities, attended research presentations, calculated their carbon footprints, explored virtually various habitats in a pipeline impact study, had a live video chat with the crew from Nautilus Live, conducted field tests with underwater ROVs, and even went on a shark tagging trip. And that was just week one!


Read the SBHS OSTEM Week 1 Newsletter.  

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities at NSU's Oceanographic Center, please email Wendy Wood or call her at 954-262-3617.

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Scholar All-AmericansSenior Rachel Lewis (Cardiff, Wales) and freshmen Alejandra Velasco (Jalisco, Mexico) and Katrina Wang (Shenzhen, China) were honored by the Women’s Golf Coaches Association (WGCA).

Ricardo Celia (Sr., Barranquilla, Colombia), Ian Facey (Jr., Miami), Mitch Farrer (Sr., West Sussex, England) and Oscar Lengdèn (Jr., Helsingborg, Sweden) were recognized among only 75 men’s golfers from all of Division II to receive this honor.

Among other stringent criteria for selection is a minimum GPA of 3.50!

Read NSU's Women's Golf Release

Men's GolfRead NSU's Men's Golf Release

If you are interested in supporting NSU Athletics, please email Terry Mularkey or call him at (954) 262-2064.

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A recent Sun-Sentinel brief lauds NSU for continuing the tradition of taking classes off-campus to learners, to include now offering popular sessions at retirement communities throughout South Florida.

Read Sun-Sentinel Article

If you are interested in supporting NSU's Life-Long Learning Institute, please email Terry Mularkey or call him at (954) 262-2064.

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NSU’s Men Soccer team and coaches helped stage game during which Striker Boy dismantles a make-believe bomb to the delight of hundreds of fans in attendance before being whisked away by helicopter to save a burning building.

Read More

If you are interested in supporting NSU Athletics, please email Terry Mularkey or call him at (954) 262-2064.

Former Shark J.D. Martinez was named American League Player of the Week this month, as announced by Major League Baseball.

Read NSU's Release

If you are interested in supporting NSU Athletics, please email Terry Mularkey or call him at (954) 262-2064.

The Wilsons -- mother, father and son – are all nurses in the Lee Memorial Health System, each having graduated from NSU’s College of Nursing, with father and son graduating together.

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss other giving opportunities, please email Denise Rau, or call her at (954) 262-2163. 

Click the thumbnail above to view our gallery

This is the second year that NSU's Alvin Sherman Library, Research and Information Technology Center has won the “Favorite Free Fun” category.

In serving as a joint-use facility open to the public, Alvin Sherman Library uses rich programming to promote early literacy and a love of reading. Their innovative series also engages enthusiastic learners of all ages as well as learners coping with special disorders.

Samples include:

  • All-Star Storytime for children (and parents) coping with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Sharkey’s Reading Club so kids develop an early love for books
  • Raise-a-Reader @ Sharkey’s Storytime so caregivers can explore with their young charges kid-friendly websites and the learning world online
  • A Day for Children! This event encourages children to be part of Sharkey’s Reading Club
  • Science Alive!
  • Summer S.T.E.M. for Tweens

Plus:

  • Cultural exhibitions
  • Concerts
  • Genealogy Days

Along with rich resources:

  • 480 computers
  • 22 study rooms
  • 485 research databases

*Alvin Sherman Library's website tallies 1.5 million hits and 2.4 million page views each year.

*Another coup for NSU's libraries: NSU's Health Professions Division Library just won the Springshare Innovation in Academic Libraries Award.

If you would like to learn more, or to discuss giving opportunities, please email Elaine Blattner, or call her at (954) 262-2409.

News Report Video

Watch Video Here

What’s worse than a shark bite? Turns out bacteria from a shark bite is what kept one victim in the hospital, calling for a special antibiotic regimen.

Derek Burkholder, Ph.D. from NSU’s Guy Harvey Research Institute and Nathan Unger, Pharm.D. from NSU’s College of Pharmacy provide further details in stories by both WPLG Channel 10 Miami and WTVJ, NBC-6 Miami.

NSU Release

3D Printing ModelsSince purchasing its first 3D printer last June, students from NSU’s University School are taking printing to the “Third Dimension”.  In courses ranging from art, web design and AP computer science, the young talents have replicated computer-engineered drawings to create art, a working carousel, Ferris wheel and even clothing.

Casey Lynn, a class of 2015 student at NSU’s College of Dental Medicine wrote an article on potential 3D printing applications for ASDA News.

For more information about NSU’s University School and initiatives in need of support, please email Wynne Avellanet, or call her at (954) 262-4524.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Museum of ArtExhibition Dates:
July 13 - September 21, 2014

Location:
NSU's Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale

Sponsors:
Hudson Family Foundation

With support by:

Wells Fargo and The McDaniel, Siegel and Johnson Families in memory of Anna T. McDaniel.


Learn More 

Puerto Rico CampusDate: August 28, 2014

Location: NSU's Puerto Rico campus in San Jaun

Learn More

Annual Induction Ceremony

Date: October 11, 2014

Time: 6:00 p.m.

If you would like to learn more, please email Karen Araque, or call her at (954) 262-2108.

Annual Distinguished Alumni Achievement Awards

Date: November 13, 2014

Time: 6:00 p.m.

If you would like to learn more, please visit our Distinguished Alumni page, email NSU Alumni Association, or call (954) 262-2118

 



Funds from the annual Tiara Ball raise funds for cancer research conducted by NSU’s Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute. Please mark your calendars and plan to join the Royal Dames on November 22, 2014 to advance the mantra: “Man is not destined to die of Cancer.”

SHARK ON!

Grad Cap Collage

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