Evaluating Hispanics' Satisfaction with Hospice Care: A Cultural Diversity

Grant Winners

  • Alina M. Perez, J.D., L.C.S.W. – College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Barbara Greenberg, Ph.D. – College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Jennie Lou, M.D. – College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Maryellen Antonetti, M.P.H., PA-C – College of Health Care Sciences

Deans

  • Anthony Silvagni – College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Rick Davis – College of Health Care Sciences

Abstract

Statistics demonstrate that Hispanics in the United States are under-represented in hospice and palliative care. Studies suggest that this under-utilization may be due to cultural barriers that exist when the language, experiences and cultural perspectives of the patient differs from that of the provider. In response to this problem, Hospice by the Sea, in Boca Raton, Florida, has created a new program called the Cultural Diversity Initiative. One of the goals of this program is to improve the delivery of health care services to dying Hispanic patients and their families through strategies designed to ensure that they receive care that is culturally and linguistically responsive to their needs. Among these strategies is the creation of the Hispanic Interdisciplinary Team (The Hispanic Team), which will focus directly on the delivery of care to Hispanic hospice patients.

This proposal seeks to obtain funds to determine how this culturally sensitive intervention (The Hispanic Team) will affect patient and caregiver satisfaction with hospice services. The methodology will involve qualitative measures of patient/caregiver satisfaction collected through focus groups and interviews. In addition, results will be supported by quantitative analysis of data collected from satisfaction surveys. Data analysis will compare pre- and post -study levels of patient and caregiver satisfaction. Information collected from this study will help to determine if the use of a culturally sensitive team could be integrated into a best practice model for hospice care that will eliminate some of the barriers to utilization of end-of-life care experienced by Hispanics and other minority groups.